Pew Research Center Feb. 11, 2008

Immigration to Play Lead Role In Future U.S. Growth

If current trends continue, immigrants arriving from 2005 to 2050 and their descendants will account for 82% of the population growth in the United States during this period, according to new projections from the Pew Research Center.

Hispanic Jan. 24, 2008

Arizona’s Population Growth Parallels America’s

How will Arizona’s new law penalizing businesses for hiring unauthorized immigrants affect its labor force? The Pew Hispanic Center provides up-to-date estimates of the state’s demographics as well as two other fact sheets analyzing the characteristics of the overall Latino population in the U.S. and of foreign-born immigrants of all origins.

Hispanic Aug. 30, 2007

A Changing Racial and Ethnic Mix in U.S. Public Schools

A new analysis of public school enrollment data by the Pew Hispanic Center finds that in the dozen years from 1993-94 to 2005-06, white students became significantly less isolated from minority students while, at the same time, black and Hispanic students became slightly more isolated from white students.

Hispanic Jul. 24, 2007

The Latino Electorate: A Widening Gap between Voters and the Larger Hispanic Population in the U.S.

Latinos made up a slightly larger share of the total voter turnout in the 2006 election than in 2002; but, a new Pew Hispanic analysis finds, the Latino vote continued to lag well behind growth of the Latino population primarily because a high percentage of the new Hispanics in the U.S. are either too young to vote or are not citizens.

Hispanic Oct. 18, 2006

The Changing Landscape of American Public Education

Public school enrollment in the U.S. has risen sharply since the early 1990s, with Hispanic students accounting for about two-thirds of the increase. The growth has triggered a surge in new school construction, but two-thirds of the new facilities are not serving Hispanic students.

Hispanic Oct. 17, 2006

Who Are the Immigrants?

This Pew Hispanic Center statistical profile provides a detailed look at the foreign-born population in the United States.

With a foreign-born population of over 35 million, who are these immigrants and what do we know about them?

Hispanic Oct. 12, 2006

From 200 Million to 300 Million: The Numbers behind Population Growth

The U.S. population will reach 300 million some time this month. This fact sheet presents an analysis, by race/ethnicity and nativity, of the 100 million people who were added to the population since 1966-67. In addition, the fact sheet breaks down the U.S. population, again by race/ethnicity and nativity, when it was 200 million and at the 300 million mark.

Hispanic Sep. 28, 2006

41.9 Million and Counting

A statistical view of Hispanics at mid-decade

Pew Research Center Aug. 17, 2006

The French-Muslim Connection

When Muslim youths rioted in French suburbs last year, critics were quick to fault the French assimilation model. But recent findings suggest that the French can claim some success.

Hispanic Aug. 10, 2006

Growth in the Foreign-Born Workforce and Employment of the Native Born

Rapid increases in the foreign-born population at the state level are not associated with negative effects on the employment of native-born workers, according to a study by the Pew Hispanic Center.