Pew Research CenterMarch 12, 2012

Social Networking Sites and Politics

Postings on social networking sites reveal surprises for many users when it comes to the political views of their friends. Nearly four-in-ten users discovered through postings by friends that their political beliefs were different than they thought. A small percentage of users blocked, unfriended or hidden someone on the site because their political postings.

Pew Research CenterDecember 8, 2011

Twitter and the Campaign

The political conversation on Twitter is markedly different than that on blogs—and both are decidedly different than the political narrative presented by the mainstream press, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism that analyzed more than 20 million tweets, the online conversation and traditional news coverage about the campaign.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 22, 2011

What new uses of the Internet might emerge in the 2012 campaign?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 22, 2011

Ask the Expert

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Pew Research CenterMarch 17, 2011

The Internet and Campaign 2010

More than half of U.S. adults used the internet for political purposes in the last cycle, far surpassing the 2006 midterm contest. They hold mixed views about the impact of the internet: It enables extremism, while helping the like-minded find each other. It provides diverse sources, but makes it harder to find truthful sources.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 26, 2011

Twitter and Social Networking in the 2010 Midterm Elections

More than one-in-five online Americans engaged with the 2010 midterm elections or campaign on Twitter or social networking sites; Republicans — especially Tea Party supporters — caught up with Democrats in social media use.

Pew Research CenterDecember 28, 2010

Mobile Politics 2010

More than a quarter of American adults used their cell phones to learn about or participate in the 2010 midterm election campaign.

Pew Research CenterApril 27, 2010

How Americans Interact with Government Online

Fully 82% of internet users (61% of all Americans) looked for information or completed a transaction on a government website in the past year. Most government website visitors were happy with their experience, accomplishing everything or much of what they wanted to do.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 1, 2009

Civic Engagement Online: Politics as Usual

The internet is not changing the character of civic engagement, as participation remains the domain of those with high levels of income and education. However, there are hints that forms of civic engagement anchored in blogs and social networking sites could alter long-standing patterns.

Pew Research CenterApril 15, 2009

The Internet’s Role in Campaign 2008

Three-quarters (74%) of internet users went online during the 2008 election to take part in, or get news and information about the 2008 campaign. This represents 55% of the entire U.S. adult population.