Media & News Mar. 15, 2010

State of the News Media 2010

Inside news companies, the most immediate worry is how much lost revenue the industry will regain as the economy improves. But the future of news depends on longer-term concerns. What are the prospects for alternative journalism organizations that are forming around the country? Will traditional media adapt and innovate amid continuing pressures to thin their ranks?

Media & News Mar. 1, 2010

The New News Landscape: Rise of the Internet

The overwhelming majority of Americans use multiple platforms to get news, and the internet has surpassed newspapers and radio in popularity as a platform, ranking just behind TV. News is also becoming more of a shared experience. More than 8 in 10 online news consumers get or share links in emails.

Media & News Jan. 11, 2010

How News Happens–Still

With questions about the future of journalism, a new study of the media in Baltimore, Md., examines who really reports the news that people get about their communities. Despite a rapidly expanding landscape, newspapers still drive stories.

Pew Research Center Sep. 25, 2009

Where the News Comes From — And Why It Matters

Newspapers are still the largest originating, gathering source of real news; the crisis they face is not loss of audience but loss of revenue.

Media & News Mar. 16, 2009

State of the News Media 2009

Even before the recession, the fundamental question facing journalism was whether the news industry could win a race against the clock for survival. In the last year, two important things happened that have effectively shortened the time left on that clock. Some of the numbers are chilling.

U.S. Politics Feb. 26, 2009

Newspapers Face a Challenging Calculus

The growth in readership online has not offset the decline in print for newspapers.

Media & News Feb. 11, 2009

The New Face of Washington’s Press Corps

The corps of journalists covering Washington D.C. at the dawn of the Obama administration is not so much smaller as it is dramatically transformed. And that transformation will markedly alter what Americans know and not know about the new government, as well as who will know it and who will not.

U.S. Politics Aug. 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.

U.S. Politics Mar. 17, 2008

Financial Woes Overshadow All Other Concerns For Journalists

A new survey of national and local reporters, producers, editors and executives finds soaring economic woes eclipse traditional worries about quality of coverage and credibility.

Media & News Mar. 17, 2008

State of the News Media 2008

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s annual report finds that the current crisis in journalism may be less the loss of audience than the decoupling of news and advertising. On the upside, some news organizations have become places of risk and innovation with growing connection with audiences.