Pew Research Center Sep. 25, 2009

Where the News Comes From — And Why It Matters

Newspapers are still the largest originating, gathering source of real news; the crisis they face is not loss of audience but loss of revenue.

Media & News Mar. 16, 2009

State of the News Media 2009

Even before the recession, the fundamental question facing journalism was whether the news industry could win a race against the clock for survival. In the last year, two important things happened that have effectively shortened the time left on that clock. Some of the numbers are chilling.

U.S. Politics Feb. 26, 2009

Newspapers Face a Challenging Calculus

The growth in readership online has not offset the decline in print for newspapers.

Media & News Oct. 29, 2008

The Color Of News: How Different Media Have Covered the General Election

When it comes to coverage of the campaign for president 2008, where one goes for news makes a difference, according to a new study.

Internet & Tech Aug. 28, 2008

Podcasts Proliferate, But Not Mainstream

Nearly one in five internet users (19%) has downloaded a podcast to listen to or view later — up from 12% in 2006. But podcasting has yet to become a fixture in the everyday lives of internet users, as very few download podcasts on a typical day.

U.S. Politics Aug. 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.

Media & News Jul. 21, 2008

The Changing Newsroom: Gains and Losses in Today’s Papers

It has fewer pages than three years ago, the paper stock is thinner, and the stories are shorter. There is less foreign and national news, less space devoted to science, the arts, features and a range of specialized subjects. These are just some of the changes documented in a new report by the Project for Excellence in Journalism that examines the resources in American newsrooms at a critical time.

Internet & Tech May. 19, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet – Part II

In a second dispatch, our Beijing correspondent reports that Chinese TV is back to being the voice of the government. Meanwhile, the internet has become a more wild-west version of itself, with a virtual explosion of content that runs the gamut from informative to creative, irresponsible, angry, maudlin…

Internet & Tech May. 16, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet

While the internet proved to be a faster and more varied source of news about the disaster, Chinese television reports have shown an unprecedented absence of censorship: “The faces in these productions tell everything. The soldiers are young; the grief is raw; the eyes are desperate.”

Media & News May. 8, 2008

The Daily Show: Journalism, Satire or Just Laughs?

An examination of whether America’s 4th-ranked journalist, Jon Stewart, is really the host of a news program.