Pew Research CenterJuly 10, 2008

The Faith Factor in the Media’s Primary Campaign Coverage

Despite attention to Obama’s former pastor, questions about McCain’s relationship with the conservative religious base, interest in Romney’s Mormon faith and Baptist preacher Huckabee’s strong showing, only 2% of campaign stories directly focused on religion; still that was more than the attention devoted to race and gender combined.

Pew Research CenterMarch 17, 2008

State of the News Media 2008

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s annual report finds that the current crisis in journalism may be less the loss of audience than the decoupling of news and advertising. On the upside, some news organizations have become places of risk and innovation with growing connection with audiences.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 10, 2008

New Hampshire Teaches News Media a Lesson

It wasn’t quite “Dewey Defeats Truman,” but after the Jan. 8 Granite State primary confounded many pollsters and pundits, a key story in coverage of the McCain and Clinton victories was the media’s proclivity to predict and pre-analyze the results.

Pew Research CenterDecember 19, 2007

Iraq Portrait: How the Press Has Covered Events on the Ground

Through the first 10 months of 2007, the news media’s picture of Iraq was painted mostly in bleak colors. But reports about daily attacks declined in late summer and fall, as did the amount of coverage from Iraq overall.

Pew Research CenterDecember 6, 2007

Third Quarter News: Terrorism, Tight Credit, and Tragedies

The threat of terrorism, a real estate recession, and man-made disasters all emerged as major stories in the U.S. news media in the third quarter of 2007, according to a new study of press coverage by the Project for Excellence in Journalism.

Pew Research CenterOctober 29, 2007

The Invisible Primary – Invisible No Longer

In the early months of the 2008 campaign, the media had essentially winnowed the race to a handful of candidates and offered Americans relatively little information about their records or what they would do if elected.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 12, 2007

The News You Choose

In a world without journalists, or at least without editors, what would the news agenda look like? A one-week study of a new crop of user-driven news sites by the Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests that the news agenda would be more diverse, more transitory, and often drawn from a very different and perhaps controversial list of sources.

Pew Research CenterJune 21, 2007

Missing in Action: News Coverage of Private Contract Forces in Iraq

Extensive reliance in the Iraq conflict on military forces hired by private firms is a significant new element in 21St Century warfare. But what does the American public know about this phenomenon?

Pew Research CenterMay 25, 2007

A Quarter’s Worth of News Coverage

Three-month review of media finds Iraq coverage was mostly about the U.S., while 2008 campaign coverage was mostly about Democrats.

Pew Research CenterMarch 8, 2007

A Verdict on the Media’s Verdict on the Libby Trial

The jury has spoken in the perjury and obstruction trial of Scooter Libby that so intimately involved the journalism profession itself. We know the vice-president’s former top aide was found guilty. But who and what else did the media implicate in its post-verdict coverage?