Pew Research CenterNovember 9, 2011

Cain’s Bad Stretch–A Campaign Coverage Update

While his support continued to hold in the polls, businessman and GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain was the focus of a much tougher narrative in the news media last week, according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism.

Pew Research CenterOctober 17, 2011

The Media Primary

Rick Perry received the most favorable coverage of any candidate for president during the first five months of the race, but now Herman Cain is enjoying that distinction. Meanwhile Barack Obama has had the roughest treatment, according to a new survey which combines traditional research methods and computer algorithmic technology to code the level and tone of news coverage.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 26, 2011

How People Learn About Their Local Community

Contrary to much of the conventional understanding of how people learn about their communities, Americans turn to a wide range of platforms to get local news and information, and where they turn varies considerably depending and the subject matter and their age.

Pew Research CenterMay 5, 2011

How the Media Have Covered bin Laden’s Death So Far

Contrary to what happens with most major national news events, the discussion of the death of Osama bin Laden in the mainstream and new media has not shifted quickly to political winners and losers. An analysis of hundreds of thousands of stories and millions of social media postings finds the discussion has remained focused on the facts of what happened.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 24, 2011

Religion in the News: 2010

Though still small in volume, mainstream media coverage of religion in 2010 doubled over the preceding year. Events and controversies related to Islam — especially a proposed Islamic center in New York City — dominated coverage, bumping the Catholic Church from the top spot.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 19, 2011

Media Analysis: How the Press Covered the Tragedy in Tucson

A discussion about the tenor of political discourse in America, including its role as a potential catalyst for violence, was the leading media storyline in the aftermath of the Arizona tragedy.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 11, 2011

The Year in News 2010

A review of three different research efforts by the Pew Research Center finds the economy was the No. 1 story of the year, the narrative evolving but with a continuing undercurrent of apprehension. Other big stories: the Haitian earthquake, the health care reform debate, the Gulf oil rig explosion, and mid-term elections.

Pew Research CenterJanuary 11, 2011

Press Coverage and Public Interest

The public tended to maintain its interest in major breaking news stories considerably longer than the press did. And the press tended to maintain substantially more interest in Washington Beltway controversies than did its audience.

Pew Research CenterDecember 30, 2010

Public’s Top Stories of the Decade — 9/11 and Katrina

The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 drew more public interest than any other story in the past decade. The 2005 hurricanes in the Gulf, high gasoline prices and the collapse of the economy in 2008 also grabbed overwhelming public attention.

Pew Research CenterDecember 21, 2010

Top Stories of 2010: Haiti Earthquake, Gulf Oil Spill

Two major disasters captured the public’s attention more than any other major stories in 2010, but Americans also kept a consistent eye on the nation’s struggling economy.