U.S. Politics Oct. 15, 2008

Who Knows News? What You Read or View Matters, but Not Your Politics

Where you turn for news may say a lot about how much you actually know. So who scores higher on a political knowledge quiz? Hardball or Hannity & Colmes? Newspapers or network news? Stewart or Colbert?

Media & News Sep. 30, 2008

Assessing the Debate: A Media/Public Disconnect?

Political pundits, seeing no knockout punch, scored a tie. But viewers awarded the win to Obama.

Pew Research Center Sep. 15, 2008

Online News: Should You Be Reading This at Work?

The internet is allowing Americans to stay constantly informed about the news of the day — on the company dollar – regardless of whether keeping up-to-date is important to their job.

U.S. Politics Aug. 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.

U.S. Politics May. 14, 2008

Public Says Press Should Not Declare Obama the Winner

Fully 72% of the public – including comparable percentages of Democrats, Republicans and independents – say that journalists should not be anointing Obama as the Democratic nominee at this stage in the race.

Media & News May. 8, 2008

The Daily Show: Journalism, Satire or Just Laughs?

An examination of whether America’s 4th-ranked journalist, Jon Stewart, is really the host of a news program.

U.S. Politics Feb. 6, 2008

Where Men and Women Differ in Following the News

A look at the public’s news interests over the past year shows continuing differences between women and men in the types of news stories that they follow very closely.

U.S. Politics Aug. 22, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

In the second of two parts, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience news preferences to examine news interest across decades and describe how the public’s news interests have changed — or not changed — over different news eras.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

Despite dramatic structural changes in the news media since the 1980s, the interests of news audiences have changed very little over the past several decades. Disaster News and Money News have been at the top of the charts throughout, while Tabloid News and Foreign News have been at the bottom. In this first of two reports, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience preferences taken by the PRC (and predecessor organizations) since 1986.

U.S. Politics Jun. 20, 2007

Why Change the Channel?

For most of the public, broadcast network news is all the same. Not so cable news: Nearly half the public sees real differences among CNN, Fox News and MSNBC.