Internet & Tech Sep. 10, 2009

Americans Researching the Recession Also Look for Digital Diversions

Most Americans who have turned to online sources for economic information have also used the internet to take their minds off of their financial troubles, especially younger online economic users.

Media & News Mar. 16, 2009

State of the News Media 2009

Even before the recession, the fundamental question facing journalism was whether the news industry could win a race against the clock for survival. In the last year, two important things happened that have effectively shortened the time left on that clock. Some of the numbers are chilling.

U.S. Politics Feb. 26, 2009

Newspapers Face a Challenging Calculus

The growth in readership online has not offset the decline in print for newspapers.

U.S. Politics Feb. 3, 2009

Limbaugh Holds onto his Niche — Conservative Men

While Rush’s syndicated radio show does not have the reach of other conservative favorites like Bill O’Reilly’s television program, his audience is by far the most conservative of any program or network tested by a Pew Research survey. It was also the most male.

U.S. Politics Oct. 15, 2008

Who Knows News? What You Read or View Matters, but Not Your Politics

Where you turn for news may say a lot about how much you actually know. So who scores higher on a political knowledge quiz? Hardball or Hannity & Colmes? Newspapers or network news? Stewart or Colbert?

Media & News Sep. 30, 2008

Assessing the Debate: A Media/Public Disconnect?

Political pundits, seeing no knockout punch, scored a tie. But viewers awarded the win to Obama.

Pew Research Center Sep. 15, 2008

Online News: Should You Be Reading This at Work?

The internet is allowing Americans to stay constantly informed about the news of the day — on the company dollar – regardless of whether keeping up-to-date is important to their job.

U.S. Politics Aug. 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.

U.S. Politics May. 14, 2008

Public Says Press Should Not Declare Obama the Winner

Fully 72% of the public – including comparable percentages of Democrats, Republicans and independents – say that journalists should not be anointing Obama as the Democratic nominee at this stage in the race.

Media & News May. 8, 2008

The Daily Show: Journalism, Satire or Just Laughs?

An examination of whether America’s 4th-ranked journalist, Jon Stewart, is really the host of a news program.