U.S. Politics Aug. 22, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

In the second of two parts, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience news preferences to examine news interest across decades and describe how the public’s news interests have changed — or not changed — over different news eras.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

Despite dramatic structural changes in the news media since the 1980s, the interests of news audiences have changed very little over the past several decades. Disaster News and Money News have been at the top of the charts throughout, while Tabloid News and Foreign News have been at the bottom. In this first of two reports, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience preferences taken by the PRC (and predecessor organizations) since 1986.

U.S. Politics Jun. 20, 2007

Why Change the Channel?

For most of the public, broadcast network news is all the same. Not so cable news: Nearly half the public sees real differences among CNN, Fox News and MSNBC.

Media & News May. 25, 2007

A Quarter’s Worth of News Coverage

Three-month review of media finds Iraq coverage was mostly about the U.S., while 2008 campaign coverage was mostly about Democrats.

U.S. Politics May. 23, 2007

Growing Up With the News

In an era when war, tragedy and scandal often dominate the headlines, America’s parents are more likely to encourage children to follow the news than they are to shield them from it.

U.S. Politics Apr. 5, 2007

Who Do You Trust for War News?

Four years into the Iraq war, most Americans say they have little or no confidence in the information they receive — from either the military or the media — about how things are going on the ground.

Media & News Mar. 12, 2007

State of the American News Media, 2007: Mainstream Media Go Niche

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s fourth annual report finds every sector of TV news lost audience in 2006. Newspapers, while garnering larger audiences for their content via online platforms, faced more downbeat financial assessments.

U.S. Politics Mar. 8, 2007

Top Journalists Less Widely Admired Than 20 Years Ago

Only a slim majority can now name the journalist they admire most and the preferences are scattered across the networks, cable news channels, public television and even Comedy Central.

Internet & Tech Feb. 6, 2007

Election Newshounds Speak Up

If you ask political news consumers what they like most about their favorite platform for news, a vivid image of a typical TV, newspaper, and internet political news consumer will emerge from their own comments. All three media forms win praise from their primary fans for their convenience but the context for its definition varies.