U.S. Politics Apr. 27, 2011

Deficit: More Concern, Less Optimism

The public increasingly views the federal budget deficit as a major problem the country must address now, but is becoming less optimistic progress will be made on the issue.

Apr. 12, 2011

Home Sweet Home. Still.

The five-year swoon in home prices has done little to shake the confidence of the American public in the investment value of homeownership. A new survey finds that fully eight-in-ten (81%) adults agree that buying a home is the best long-term investment a person can make although there has been some falloff in the intensity of the public’s faith.

U.S. Politics Apr. 12, 2011

The Deficit Debate: Where the Public Stands

In a number of surveys over the past several months, the Pew Research Center has shown where the public stands on the budget deficit — the seriousness of the problem, views of competing policy proposals, and its confidence in the policymakers.

U.S. Politics Apr. 7, 2011

Obama Ratings Slip Amid Economic Anxieties

About as many now approve (47%) as disapprove (45%) of the way Obama is handling his job with the president getting especially negative ratings on his handling of the budget deficit and the overall economy. The GOP has an advantage on the budget, while Democrats are favored on traits such as concern for average people, willingness to work with the opposition, and ethics. The parties run about even on jobs and health care.

U.S. Politics Mar. 16, 2011

Republicans Are Losing Ground on the Deficit, But Obama’s Not Gaining

Far fewer Americans now say that Republicans in Congress have the better approach to the budget deficit than did so in November with the GOP losing ground among political independents as well as key elements of the its base, including Tea Party supporters. But the public is no more supportive of Barack Obama’s approach to the budget deficit than it was in November.

Hispanic Mar. 10, 2011

New Jobs in Recession and Recovery: Who Are Getting Them and Who Are Not

In testimony before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement, the Pew Hispanic Center’s Rakesh Kochhar explains why for the first time since the official end of the Great Recession in June 2009, native-born workers in the second half of 2010 joined foreign-born workers in experiencing the beginnings of a recovery in employment.

U.S. Politics Feb. 10, 2011

Rethinking Budget Cutting

Views about federal spending are beginning to change. Americans no longer call for more spending on many popular programs. Still, support for cutting spending remains limited, though in a few cases it has risen noticeably. The public remains reluctant either to cut spending — or to raise taxes – to balance state budgets.

U.S. Politics Jan. 20, 2011

Economy, Jobs Top Public’s Policy Agenda

Americans overwhelmingly cite the economy and jobs as the most important issues facing the president and new Congress. On health care reform, roughly as many would like to see legislation expanded as have it repealed.

U.S. Politics Dec. 15, 2010

For the Public, a Tough Year Ends on a Down Note

Consistent with the mood of the nation all year, 2010 is closing on a down note — but not as low as in December 2008. Fully 72% are dissatisfied with national conditions, 89% rate national economic conditions as only fair or poor, and majorities or pluralities think the country is losing ground on nine of 12 major issues.

Pew Research Center Dec. 14, 2010

Reagan’s Recession

In the depths of the 1981-1982 recession, Americans were far more displeased with their president and his policies than were their predecessors during the Great Depression, more so even than in today’s high-unemployment economy.