Internet & Tech Dec. 19, 2007

Teen Content Creators

Some 93% of teens use the internet, and more of them than ever are treating it as a venue for social interaction — a place where they can share creations, tell stories, and interact with others.

Internet & Tech Jun. 20, 2007

Don’t Blame Me: It’s the Phone’s Fault!

Many internet and cell phone users find devices and applications too complicated or hardly worth the trouble. Here are some ideas to address those problems.

U.S. Politics Jun. 19, 2007

How Serious Is Polling’s Cell-Only Problem?

The landline-less are different from regular telephone users in many of their opinions and their numbers are growing fast. Can survey researchers meet this challenge?

U.S. Politics Jun. 19, 2007

What’s Missing from National RDD Surveys? The Impact of the Growing Cell-Only Population

The number of cell-phone-only households has continued to grow — 12.8% of all households by the end of 2006, according to the National Health Interview Survey. While the noncoverage problem is currently not damaging estimates for the entire population, a study finds evidence that it does create biased estimates on certain variables for young adults, 25% of whom are cell-only.

Internet & Tech May. 6, 2007

A Typology of Information and Communication Technology Users

The advent of Web 2.0 invites users to participate in the commons of cyberspace. Yet little is known about which segments of the population are inclined to make robust use of the new technologies and which aren’t. Using data from a new survey, the Pew Internet & American Life project has developed a typology of people’s relationship to information and communications technology.

Internet & Tech Feb. 26, 2007

The World of Wireless Widens

Some 34% of internet users have logged onto the internet using a wireless connection. Users of wireless access show deeper engagement with cyberspace — at least when focusing on two basic online activities, email and news.

Pew Research Center Feb. 22, 2007

Cell Phone Counter-Revolution

To keep lawmakers focused on debate — and limit lobbyists’ influence — statehouses from coast to coast are restricting cell phones, instant messaging and use of those mini-computers found under the thumbs of compulsive e-mailers on the floors of state legislatures.