Media & News Apr. 23, 2008

So, Just How Different Is Rupert Murdoch’s New Wall Street Journal?

A Project for Excellence in Journalism content study finds that, to date, the newly staked out battleground between the Journal and Times seems to be located mostly on the playing field of politics.

Media & News Mar. 17, 2008

State of the News Media 2008

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s annual report finds that the current crisis in journalism may be less the loss of audience than the decoupling of news and advertising. On the upside, some news organizations have become places of risk and innovation with growing connection with audiences.

U.S. Politics Mar. 17, 2008

Financial Woes Overshadow All Other Concerns For Journalists

A new survey of national and local reporters, producers, editors and executives finds soaring economic woes eclipse traditional worries about quality of coverage and credibility.

U.S. Politics Aug. 9, 2007

Small Audience For Murdoch’s Dow Jones Deal, Few Expect Change

A majority of Americans who are following the story of publisher Rupert Murdoch’s purchase of the Wall Street Journal say the sale will have little or no impact on the quality of the newspaper.

Media & News Jul. 30, 2007

Publisher Murdoch’s U.S. Track Record

In light of his apparently successful bid to buy Down Jones, what is Rupert Murdoch’s record in the American newspaper business?

Media & News May. 25, 2007

A Quarter’s Worth of News Coverage

Three-month review of media finds Iraq coverage was mostly about the U.S., while 2008 campaign coverage was mostly about Democrats.

Media & News Mar. 12, 2007

State of the American News Media, 2007: Mainstream Media Go Niche

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s fourth annual report finds every sector of TV news lost audience in 2006. Newspapers, while garnering larger audiences for their content via online platforms, faced more downbeat financial assessments.

Media & News Nov. 20, 2006

Back to the Age of Local Publishers?

One major trend of the last year is the emergence of private, local ownership groups returning to a prominent place in the newspaper industry. It appears that in several cities these private interests value newspapers more highly than the publicly traded equity markets.

Media & News Mar. 14, 2006

State of the News Media

As audiences shift to new online media, print’s problems have accelerated. But newspapers can still avoid a death spiral, according to the Project for Excellence in Journalism.