Dec. 14, 2011

Barely Half of U.S. Adults Are Married – A Record Low

Barely half of all adults in the United States–a record low–are currently married, and the median age at first marriage has never been higher for brides and grooms, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census data.

Pew Research Center Apr. 12, 2011

Are views of marriage affected by the type of family people grew up in?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Pew Research Center Mar. 21, 2011

Do people worry about marriage becoming obsolete?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Mar. 9, 2011

For Millennials, Parenthood Trumps Marriage

While 52% of Millennials say being a good parent is “one of the most important things” in life, just 30% say the same about having a successful marriage

Feb. 16, 2011

The Public Renders a Split Verdict On Changes in Family Structure

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the nation’s families that have unfolded over the past half century. About a third generally accepts the changes, a third is tolerant but skeptical and a third considers them bad for society.

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Nov. 18, 2010

Infographic: Five Decades of Marriage Trends

Interactive charts that show trends related to marriage, children and household composition from 1960 thru 2008.

Nov. 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families

Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among those on the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder. A new survey finds that these less-advantaged adults are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

Oct. 22, 2010

Is the Recession Linked to Fewer Marriages?

When researchers look at possible links among social, economic and demographic trends — such as the current recession and declining marriage rates — they face a challenge. Two trends may be heading in the same direction, but are they related? Correlation, the statisticians frequently warn, is no guarantee of causation.

Oct. 7, 2010

The Reversal of the College Marriage Gap

In a reversal of long-standing marital patterns, college-educated young adults are now slightly more likely than young adults lacking a bachelor’s degree to have married by the age of 30.

Jun. 4, 2010

Marrying Out

A record 14.6% of all new marriages in the U.S in 2008 were between spouses of a different race or ethnicity from one another, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of new census data. Of all newlyweds in 2008, 9% of whites, 16% of blacks, 26% of Hispanics and 31% of Asians married outside their race/ethnicity. Patterns also varied by region (intermarriage is most common in the West) and by gender.