Religion Mar. 8, 2012

Faith on the Move

There are an estimated 214 million people who have migrated across international borders as of 2010. Almost half of the migrants are Christians while a little over a quarter of them are Muslims. The vast majority end up immigrating to a relatively few areas — North America, Europe, Australia and the Arab states of the Persian Gulf.

Faith-on-the-Move-140temp
Religion Mar. 8, 2012

Map: Faith on the Move

Select one of 231 countries or the global view and choose “into” or “out of” to see a snapshot of how many people have migrated to and from the country as of 2010.

Hispanic Jan. 9, 2012

U.S. Foreign-Born Population: How Much Change From 2009 to 2010?

A new Pew Hispanic Center analysis of Census Bureau data shows the foreign-born population in the U.S.—39.9 million in 2010—is 1.6% greater than it was in 2009, markedly lower than the reported increase of 4%. The new growth estimate stems from the Center’s revisions to the 2009 Census data.

Hispanic Dec. 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrants: Length of Residency, Patterns of Parenthood

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s recent endorsement of a proposal to create a path for unauthorized immigrants to gain legal status if they have lived in the country for a long period of time has prompted renewed interest in the characteristics of this population. An analysis finds that nearly two-thirds of the 10.2 million unauthorized adult immigrants have lived in the U.S. for at least ten years.

Hispanic Jul. 11, 2011

The Mexican-American Boom: Births Overtake Immigration

Births have overtaken immigration as the main driver of the dynamic growth in the U.S. Hispanic population, especially among the largest of all Hispanic groups — Mexican-Americans.

Hispanic Mar. 25, 2011

Hispanics Account for More Than Half of Nation’s Growth in Past Decade

The 2010 Census counted 50.5 million Hispanics in the United States. Hispanics now account for 16.3% of the total population. Among children ages 17 and younger, there were 17.1 million Latinos in 2010, or 23.1% of this age group. Overall, racial and ethnic minorities accounted for 91.7% of the nation’s growth over the decade.

Pew Research Center Mar. 2, 2011

If there are now fewer unauthorized immigrants in the U.S. where did they go?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Hispanic Feb. 17, 2011

Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 2009

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2009 American Community Survey.

Hispanic Feb. 1, 2011

Unauthorized Immigrant Population: National and State Trends, 2010

As of March 2010, 11.2 million unauthorized immigrants were living in the U.S., virtually unchanged from a year earlier and remaining well below the population’s peak of 12 million in 2007. The number of unauthorized immigrants in the nation’s workforce (8 million) also has not changed in the past year.

Hispanic Oct. 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

Immigrants are gaining jobs at a time when native-born workers continue to sustain losses. Foreign-born workers job gains may be the result of greater flexibility with regard to wages and hours of work or greater mobility. But despite rising employment, immigrants have experienced a sharp decline in earnings as well as a still substantial net loss in jobs.