Hispanic Dec. 13, 2007

The Immigration Debate: Controversy Heats Up, Hispanics Feel a Chill

The 2007 National Survey of Latinos finds that Hispanics in the U.S. are feeling a range of negative effects from increased public attention and stepped up enforcement measures.

Pew Research Center Nov. 29, 2007

Immigration Takes Center Stage at GOP YouTube Debate

In a format the public says it prefers — “regular people,” not journalists, posing the questions — immigration emerged as the hot-button issue. Were the candidates’ answers in sync with GOP voters’ opinions?

Hispanic Oct. 25, 2007

Between Here and There: How Attached Do Latino Immigrants Remain to Their Native Country?

Most maintain some kind of connection to their native country, but only one-in-ten can be considered to be highly attached.

Global Oct. 4, 2007

World Publics Welcome Global Trade — But Not Immigration

A 47-nation survey finds broad support for the key tenets of economic globalization, including free trade, multinational corporations and free markets. Yet concerns exist about inequality, threats to traditional culture, threats to the environment and threats posed by immigration.

Media & News Jun. 18, 2007

Did Talk Hosts Help Derail the Immigration Bill?

PEJ’s Talk Show Index finds immigration was the second-most popular topic from May 13-June 8, and airwaves discussion was dominated by hosts opposed to the legislation who often referred to it with the politically damning term “amnesty bill.”

U.S. Politics Jun. 7, 2007

Mixed Views on Immigration Bill

The public is ambivalent about the immigration bill being debated in the Senate, but a majority favors one of its key goals – providing a way for illegal aliens to become citizens. The public supports such a provision even when it is described as “amnesty,” a new Pew survey finds.

U.S. Politics Apr. 12, 2007

The Immigration Divide

With his renewed push for a comprehensive immigration bill, President Bush is advancing a potentially powerful political wedge issue, but one with an unlikely twist: Immigration fractures the president’s own party at least as much as it divides the opposition.