INT_Quiz-Americanfamily
Feb. 16, 2011

Quiz: Judging Family Trends: Where Do You Fit?

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the American family that have unfolded over the past half century.

Feb. 16, 2011

The Public Renders a Split Verdict On Changes in Family Structure

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the nation’s families that have unfolded over the past half century. About a third generally accepts the changes, a third is tolerant but skeptical and a third considers them bad for society.

Jan. 18, 2011

A Portrait of Stepfamilies

More than four-in-ten adults have at least one step relative. They are just as likely as others to say family is important, but they typically feel a stronger sense of obligation to biological family members than to step relatives.

Nov. 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families

Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among those on the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder. A new survey finds that these less-advantaged adults are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

Sep. 9, 2010

Since the Start of the Great Recession, More Children Raised by Grandparents

One child in 10 in the U.S. lives with a grandparent, a share that increased slowly and steadily over the past decade before rising sharply from 2007 to 2008, the first year of the Great Recession. About 40% of all children who live with a grandparent (or grandparents) are also being raised primarily by that grandparent.

Hispanic Aug. 11, 2010

Unauthorized Immigrants and Their U.S.-Born Children

Unauthorized immigrants comprise about 4% of the adult population, but their children make up a much larger share of both the newborn population (8%) and the overall child population (7% of those younger than age 18) in this country.

Jun. 11, 2010

The Typical Modern Mother: There Isn’t One

Today’s mothers of newborns are more likely than their counterparts two decades earlier to be ages 35 and older, to have some college education, to be unmarried or to be nonwhite — but not all at once.

Mar. 18, 2010

The Return of the Multi-Generational Family Household

The multi-generational American family household is staging a comeback — driven in part by the job losses and home foreclosures of recent years, but more so by demographic changes that have been gathering steam for decades. As of 2008, a record 49 million Americans, or 16.1% of the total U.S. population, lived in such a household, up from 28 million, or 12.l%, in 1980. Such households had been more common a century ago, but began to fall out of favor after World War II. Now they are coming back.

Nov. 24, 2009

Home for the Holidays…and Every Other Day

The journey home won’t be quite as far this year for many young adults. Instead of traveling across country or across town, many grown sons and daughters will be coming to the holiday dinner table from their old bedroom down the hall, which now doubles as their recession-era refuge.

Hispanic Apr. 14, 2009

A Portrait of Unauthorized Immigrants in the United States

Unauthorized immigrants living in the U.S. are more geographically dispersed than in the past and are more likely than either U.S.-born residents or legal immigrants to live in a household with a spouse and children. But the recent rapid growth in the undocumented immigrant labor force has come to a halt. The new report also includes population and labor force estimates for each state.