Fact TankMay 1, 2013

Public optimism on housing can outrun the market

Tuesday’s report on the S&P/Case-Shiller home-price index showed a 9.3% increase between February 2012 and February 2013 — the biggest year-over-year increase in the 20-city composite index since before the housing bubble burst. Is housing, at long last, on the road to recovery? Many Americans already think so. A Pew Research survey in March found that 52% of people […]

April 4, 2013

Demographics of Asian Americans

The demographic data shown in this interactive display the varied population sizes and characteristics of the largest Asian origin groups, based on the updated edition of our survey, “The Rise of Asian Americans.”

February 21, 2013

Young Adults Shed Debt After Recession

Young adults have shed substantially more debt than older adults did during the Great Recession and its immediate aftermath—mainly by virtue of owning fewer houses and cars and paring credit card balances.

HispanicJanuary 26, 2012

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

A majority of Latinos (54%) believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.

April 12, 2011

Home Sweet Home. Still.

The five-year swoon in home prices has done little to shake the confidence of the American public in the investment value of homeownership. A new survey finds that fully eight-in-ten (81%) adults agree that buying a home is the best long-term investment a person can make although there has been some falloff in the intensity of the public’s faith.

HispanicFebruary 17, 2011

Statistical Portrait of the Foreign-Born Population in the United States, 2009

This statistical profile of the foreign-born population is based on Pew Hispanic Center tabulations of the Census Bureau’s 2009 American Community Survey.

September 15, 2010

Walking Away

Nearly six-in-ten Americans say it is “unacceptable” for homeowners to stop making their mortgage payments, but more than a third say the practice of “walking away” from a home mortgage is acceptable under certain circumstances. Homeowners whose home values declined during the recession and those who have spent time unemployed are more likely to say that “walking away” from a mortgage is acceptable.

HispanicMay 12, 2009

Through Boom and Bust: Minorities, Immigrants and Homeownership

The ups and downs in the U.S. housing market over the past decade and a half have generated both greater gains and larger losses for minority groups than for whites.

February 19, 2009

No Place Like Home — Even if the Value Is in the Tank

Not even a housing-led recession can shake Americans’ faith in the blessings of homeownership.

U.S. PoliticsFebruary 19, 2009

One-In-Five Homeowners Feels “Underwater” On Mortgages

Those who say their homes are worth less than what they owe on their mortgages are generally younger, less affluent and more likely to be Hispanic or African American than are those who feel they would at least break even if they had to sell today.