Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century. An analysis of changes in Census question wording over recent decades reveals the challenges in trying to count and describe this fast-growing population.

Hispanic Dec. 22, 2009

Latinos Online: Narrowing the Gap

From 2006 to 2008, internet use among Latino adults rose by 10 percentage points, from 54% to 64%, compared with a 4-percentage-point rise among whites and a 2-percentage-point rise among blacks. The growth among Latinos was driven mainly by increased usage by the foreign born and those with lower incomes — groups that have low rates of online activity.

INT__DataViz-LatinoYouths
Hispanic Dec. 11, 2009

Data: Latino Youths Optimistic But Beset by Problems

A national survey finds that Latinos from ages 16 to 25 are satisfied with their lives and optimistic about their futures. They value education, hard work and career success. But they are more likely than other youths to drop out of school, live in poverty and become teen parents.

Hispanic Dec. 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans.

Hispanic Oct. 15, 2009

Updated Demographic Profiles of U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin

Five demographic profiles of Hispanic populations in the U.S. by country of origin — Guatemalan, Colombian, Honduran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian — have been added to the profiles of the five largest Hispanic populations — Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran, and Dominican — posted earlier in the year by the Pew Hispanic Center.

Hispanic Oct. 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Almost all Latino young adults say a college education is important, but only half say they themselves plan to get a degree. The reason for the disparity: Immigrants, who feel financial pressures to support a family, are half as likely as native-born Latinos to plan on graduating.

Hispanic Oct. 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths into Adulthood

Even as their share of the young adult population has risen dramatically, young Latino adults in the United States have become more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.

Hispanic Sep. 25, 2009

Hispanics, Health Insurance and Health Care Access

Six-in-ten Hispanic adults living in the United States who are neither citizens nor legal permanent residents lack health insurance.

Hispanic Sep. 16, 2009

Demographic Profiles of U.S. Hispanics by Country of Origin

More than eight-in-ten Hispanics self-identify themselves as being either of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran or Dominican origin. The characteristics of each group — including the share that is foreign born, citizen (by birth or naturalization) and proficient in English — is examined in five fact sheets.

Hispanic Jul. 22, 2009

Mexican Immigrants: How Many Come? How Many Leave?

The flow of immigrants from Mexico to the United States has declined sharply since mid-decade, but there is no evidence of an increase during this period in the number of Mexican-born migrants returning home from the U.S.