Nov. 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families

Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among those on the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder. A new survey finds that these less-advantaged adults are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

Sep. 9, 2010

Since the Start of the Great Recession, More Children Raised by Grandparents

One child in 10 in the U.S. lives with a grandparent, a share that increased slowly and steadily over the past decade before rising sharply from 2007 to 2008, the first year of the Great Recession. About 40% of all children who live with a grandparent (or grandparents) are also being raised primarily by that grandparent.

Jul. 22, 2010

Lost Income, Lost Friends — and Loss of Self-Respect

A new Pew Research Center survey finds the long-term unemployed are more likely than the short-term unemployed not only to have lost income, but also to have lost contact with close friends, suffered strains in family relations and lost some self-respect and confidence in their long-term career prospects.

Jan. 19, 2010

New Economics of Marriage: The Rise of Wives

A larger share of women today, compared with their 1970 counterparts, have more education and income than their spouses. As a result, in recent decades the economic gains associated with marriage have been greater for men than for women.

Hispanic Dec. 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans.

Oct. 1, 2009

The Harried Life of the Working Mother

A solid majority of Americans (75%) reject the idea that women should return to their traditional roles in society, but many women remain conflicted about the competing roles they play at work and at home.

Internet & Tech Oct. 19, 2008

Networked Families

Parents and spouses are using the internet and cell phones to create a “new connectedness” that builds on remote connections and shared internet experiences.

INT__Quiz-Couples
Sep. 25, 2008

Quiz: Couples Quiz

Who calls the shots in your household? Nowadays in many American families, it’s the woman who wears the pantsuit. Take our Couples Quiz to find out where you fit, then compare your results with the findings of a national survey.

Sep. 25, 2008

Women Call the Shots at Home; Public Mixed on Gender Roles in Jobs

They say it’s a man’s world, but in the typical American family, it’s the woman who wears the pantsuit. Still, Americans retain strong traditional gender preferences with respect to some job roles. To find out where you fit, take our Couples Quiz, then read the report on the findings of the national survey.

Sep. 15, 2008

Revisiting the Mommy Wars After Palin: Politics, Gender and Parenthood

A new Pew survey, like others before it, found Republicans far more troubled than Democrats by the long term trend toward mothers of young children working outside the home. But these surveys were conducted before Sarah Palin entered the political scene. The especially enthusiatic initial reponse to her vice presidential candidacy contrasts sharply with these findings.