Jul. 6, 2011

In Two Years of Economic Recovery, Women Lost Jobs, Men Found Them

During the sluggish two-year recovery from the Great Recession, men have gained 768,000 jobs while women have lost 218,000 jobs. This new gender gap in employment trends represents a sharp turnabout from the recession itself, when men lost more than twice as many jobs as women. The current recovery is the first since 1970 in which women have lost jobs while men have gained them.

Apr. 12, 2011

Home Sweet Home. Still.

The five-year swoon in home prices has done little to shake the confidence of the American public in the investment value of homeownership. A new survey finds that fully eight-in-ten (81%) adults agree that buying a home is the best long-term investment a person can make although there has been some falloff in the intensity of the public’s faith.

Hispanic Mar. 10, 2011

New Jobs in Recession and Recovery: Who Are Getting Them and Who Are Not

In testimony before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration Policy and Enforcement, the Pew Hispanic Center’s Rakesh Kochhar explains why for the first time since the official end of the Great Recession in June 2009, native-born workers in the second half of 2010 joined foreign-born workers in experiencing the beginnings of a recovery in employment.

Pew Research Center Dec. 14, 2010

How a Different America Responded to the Great Depression

The American public’s sour mood is in interesting contrast with many of the public’s views during the Great Depression of the 1930s, not only on economic, political and social issues, but also on the role of government in addressing them.

Pew Research Center Dec. 14, 2010

Reagan’s Recession

In the depths of the 1981-1982 recession, Americans were far more displeased with their president and his policies than were their predecessors during the Great Depression, more so even than in today’s high-unemployment economy.

Hispanic Oct. 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

Immigrants are gaining jobs at a time when native-born workers continue to sustain losses. Foreign-born workers job gains may be the result of greater flexibility with regard to wages and hours of work or greater mobility. But despite rising employment, immigrants have experienced a sharp decline in earnings as well as a still substantial net loss in jobs.

Oct. 22, 2010

Is the Recession Linked to Fewer Marriages?

When researchers look at possible links among social, economic and demographic trends — such as the current recession and declining marriage rates — they face a challenge. Two trends may be heading in the same direction, but are they related? Correlation, the statisticians frequently warn, is no guarantee of causation.

Sep. 24, 2010

One Recession, Two Americas

For a narrow majority of Americans (55%), the Great Recession brought a mix of unemployment, missed mortgage or rent payments, shrinking paychecks and shattered household budgets. But for the other 45%, the recession was largely free of such difficulties.

Sep. 15, 2010

Walking Away

Nearly six-in-ten Americans say it is “unacceptable” for homeowners to stop making their mortgage payments, but more than a third say the practice of “walking away” from a home mortgage is acceptable under certain circumstances. Homeowners whose home values declined during the recession and those who have spent time unemployed are more likely to say that “walking away” from a mortgage is acceptable.

Sep. 9, 2010

Since the Start of the Great Recession, More Children Raised by Grandparents

One child in 10 in the U.S. lives with a grandparent, a share that increased slowly and steadily over the past decade before rising sharply from 2007 to 2008, the first year of the Great Recession. About 40% of all children who live with a grandparent (or grandparents) are also being raised primarily by that grandparent.