HispanicApril 4, 2012

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

Nearly four decades after the United States government mandated the use of the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” to categorize Americans who trace their roots to Spanish-speaking countries, a new nationwide survey of Hispanic adults finds that these terms still haven’t been fully embraced by Hispanics themselves.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 30, 2012

Blacks’ Views of Law Enforcement, Racial Progress and News Coverage of Race

The Trayvon Martin case has highlighted issues relating to the treatment of blacks by local police departments, the state of race relations in the U.S. and press coverage of African Americans. Pew Research Center surveys in recent years have covered the opinions of African Americans on these and other issues.

ReligionAugust 30, 2011

Muslim Americans: No Signs of Growth in Alienation or Support for Extremism

While a majority of Muslim Americans say they have endured suspicion and enhanced scrutiny since the 9/11 attacks nearly 10 years ago, a wide-ranging survey finds no indication of increased alienation and anger or rising support for Islamic extremism. On the contrary, majorities of Muslim Americans express concern about the possible rise of Islamic extremism, both here and abroad.

ReligionAugust 9, 2011

Rising Restrictions on Religion

More than 2.2 billion people — nearly a third (32%) of the world’s total population of 6.9 billion — live in countries where either government restrictions on religion or social hostilities involving religion rose substantially between mid-2006 and mid-2009.

U.S. PoliticsApril 8, 2011

Civil War at 150: Still Relevant, Still Divisive

A century and a half after the firing on Fort Sumter, most Americans say the war between the North and South is still relevant to American politics and public life today. In a nation that has long endured deep racial divisions, the history of that era continues to elicit strong reactions. Nearly half of the public (46%) says it is inappropriate for today’s public officials to praise the leaders of the Confederate states during the war; 36% say such statements are appropriate.

HispanicOctober 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

About four-in-five of the nation’s estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants are of Hispanic origin; a new national survey finds that Latinos are divided over what to do with these immigrants.

Media & NewsSeptember 14, 2010

Anti-Muslim Sentiment Makes News

Coverage of a pastor’s plans to burn the Koran and the controversy over the planned Islamic center completely overshadowed coverage of Sept. 11 commemorations.

U.S. PoliticsAugust 19, 2010

Many Say Coverage of the Poor and Minorities Is Too Negative

Pluralities say that coverage of poor people and Muslims is too negative, while somewhat smaller percentages say the same about coverage of blacks and Hispanics. About a third say that coverage of wealthy people is too positive — the highest percentage for any group tested.

ReligionAugust 18, 2010

Growing Number of Americans Say Obama is a Muslim

More than a year into his presidency, 18% of Americans say that Barack Obama is a Muslim. A plurality say they do not know what religion he follows. The view that president is a Muslim is highest among his political opponents. Yet the public also generally says Obama handles his religious beliefs appropriately.

Media & NewsJuly 26, 2010

Media, Race and Obama’s First Year

A year-long study finds that, as a group, African Americans attracted relatively little attention in the U.S. mainstream news media during the first year of Barack Obama’s presidency — and what coverage there was tended to focus more on specific episodes than on broader issues and trends affecting the lives of blacks generally.