Pew Research CenterMay 22, 2009

Online Classifieds Climb

The number of online adults to use classified ad websites, such as Craigslist, more than doubled from 2005 to 2009 devastating a key revenue source for traditional newspapers

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Pew Research CenterApril 15, 2009

The Internet’s Role in Campaign 2008

Three-quarters (74%) of internet users went online during the 2008 election to take part in, or get news and information about the 2008 campaign. This represents 55% of the entire U.S. adult population.

Pew Research CenterMarch 30, 2009

Online Journalists Optimistic About Revenue, Concerned About Quality

Internet journalists see a revenue path on the web, but also say the internet is changing journalism mostly for the worse.

Pew Research CenterMarch 16, 2009

State of the News Media 2009

Even before the recession, the fundamental question facing journalism was whether the news industry could win a race against the clock for survival. In the last year, two important things happened that have effectively shortened the time left on that clock. Some of the numbers are chilling.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 26, 2009

Newspapers Face a Challenging Calculus

The growth in readership online has not offset the decline in print for newspapers.

Pew Research CenterOctober 31, 2008

Internet Now Major Source of Campaign News

Television remains the dominant source, but the percent of people who say they get most of their campaign news from the internet has tripled since 2004.

Pew Research CenterOctober 15, 2008

Who Knows News? What You Read or View Matters, but Not Your Politics

Where you turn for news may say a lot about how much you actually know. So who scores higher on a political knowledge quiz? Hardball or Hannity & Colmes? Newspapers or network news? Stewart or Colbert?

Pew Research CenterSeptember 15, 2008

JohnMcCain.com v. BarackObama.com

With roughly seven weeks left until Election Day, which candidate has the edge online, and how so? A new study by the Project for Excellence in Journalism finds both campaigns’ official sites are now quite advanced.

Pew Research CenterSeptember 15, 2008

Online News: Should You Be Reading This at Work?

The internet is allowing Americans to stay constantly informed about the news of the day — on the company dollar – regardless of whether keeping up-to-date is important to their job.

Pew Research CenterAugust 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.