U.S. Politics Aug. 17, 2008

Key News Audiences Now Blend Online and Traditional Sources

For more than a decade, audiences for most traditional news sources have steadily declined and the number of people getting news online has surged. The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press’ biannual media study also finds that a growing number of news consumers mix both old and new sources. The report presents a typology that breaks Americans into four groups: Integrators, Net-Newsers, Traditionalists and the Disengaged.

Internet & Tech Jun. 15, 2008

Politics Goes Viral Online

Already in this campaign season, more Americans — 46% — have gone online to get political news and campaign information than in all of 2004.

Internet & Tech May. 19, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet – Part II

In a second dispatch, our Beijing correspondent reports that Chinese TV is back to being the voice of the government. Meanwhile, the internet has become a more wild-west version of itself, with a virtual explosion of content that runs the gamut from informative to creative, irresponsible, angry, maudlin…

Internet & Tech May. 16, 2008

Tracking China’s Earthquake on TV and the Internet

While the internet proved to be a faster and more varied source of news about the disaster, Chinese television reports have shown an unprecedented absence of censorship: “The faces in these productions tell everything. The soldiers are young; the grief is raw; the eyes are desperate.”

Media & News Mar. 17, 2008

State of the News Media 2008

The Project for Excellence in Journalism’s annual report finds that the current crisis in journalism may be less the loss of audience than the decoupling of news and advertising. On the upside, some news organizations have become places of risk and innovation with growing connection with audiences.

U.S. Politics Jan. 11, 2008

The Internet’s Broader Role in Campaign 2008

The internet is living up to its potential as a major source for news about the presidential races. Nearly a quarter of Americans say they regularly learn something about the campaign from the internet, almost double the percentage at a comparable point in 2004.

Media & News Sep. 12, 2007

The News You Choose

In a world without journalists, or at least without editors, what would the news agenda look like? A one-week study of a new crop of user-driven news sites by the Project for Excellence in Journalism suggests that the news agenda would be more diverse, more transitory, and often drawn from a very different and perhaps controversial list of sources.

Media & News Sep. 4, 2007

Fred Thompson’s Online Campaign Is in Full Swing

When he formally enters the 2008 race this week, former Sen. Fred Thompson can behave in all ways like a presidential candidate. But on his “testing the waters” website, I’mwithFred.com, he’s already been busy reaching out to supporters.

U.S. Politics Aug. 9, 2007

Internet News Audience Highly Critical of News Organizations

Americans continue to fault news organizations for a number of perceived failures. Solid majorities criticize the news media for political bias, inaccuracy and failing to acknowledge mistakes. Some of the harshest indictments of the press come from the growing segment that relies on the internet as its main news source.

Pew Research Center Jul. 24, 2007

Uploading Democracy: Candidates Field YouTube Questions

Tuesday night’s Democratic debate was widely anticipated for its groundbreaking format. Candidates took on a host of issues asked by citizens via YouTube videos; what follows is an analysis of the format and major themes of the debate as compared with public opinion data.