Hispanic Apr. 1, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Census: The Foreign Born Are More Positive

Foreign-born Latinos are more likely to say the census is good for the Hispanic community and are more knowledgeable about the process than native-born Latinos. But large majorities of both groups plan to participate.

Pew Research Center Mar. 24, 2010

Why does the Census ask for your age?

Senior research staff answer questions from readers relating to all the areas covered by our seven projects, ranging from polling techniques and findings, to media, technology, religious, demographic and global attitudes trends.

Mar. 16, 2010

The Census: College Students Count — but Where?

Should college students be counted in the 2010 Census at their parents’ home or their school address? The Census Bureau has a cut-and-dried answer, but this question recurs each decade because census rules and people’s preferences are not always in sync.

Pew Research Center Mar. 11, 2010

Millennials, the Midterms and the Political Landscape Beyond

At a conference at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, Feb. 24, 2010, Pew Research Center analysts and outside experts discussed research findings about the Millennial generation, the American teens and twenty-somethings now making the passage into adulthood. The last of three sessions addressed the question of whether Millennials, who rocked the vote in 2008, will show up at the polls this November and how they may shape the political landscape beyond?

Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century. An analysis of changes in Census question wording over recent decades reveals the challenges in trying to count and describe this fast-growing population.

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Feb. 24, 2010

Infographic: A Portrait of Five Generations

Feb. 24, 2010

The Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change.

A new national survey focuses on American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium. These young people have begun to forge their generational personality: confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change.

Religion Feb. 17, 2010

Religion Among the Millennials

By some key measures, such as affiliation with a particular faith or regular attendance at religious services, Americans ages 18 to 29 are considerably less religious than older Americans. But by other measures such as beliefs about life after death and the existence of heaven, hell and miracles they closely resemble their elders.

Feb. 12, 2010

The Prisoner Dilemma

Should the Census count inmates in the areas where they are incarcerated or try to link them to their hometowns?

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Internet & Tech Feb. 3, 2010

Data: Teen and Young Adult Internet Use

A new Pew Internet Project report reveals that 93% of teens ages 12‐17 go online, as do 93% of young adults ages 18‐29. Three quarters (74%) of all adults ages 18 and older go online. Over the past ten years, teens and young adults have been consistently the two groups most likely to go online, even as the internet population has grown and even with documented larger increases in certain age cohorts (e.g. adults 65 and older).