February 9, 2012

Young, Underemployed and Optimistic

A plurality of the American public believes that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today’s economy — and a lopsided majority says it’s more difficult for today’s young adults than it was for their parents’ generation to pay for college, find a job, buy a home or save for the future. But long-term economic optimism among young adults remains unscarred.

November 7, 2011

The Rising Age Gap in Economic Well-Being

Older adults have made dramatic gains relative to younger adults in their economic well being during the past quarter century, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of data from two key U.S. Census sources.

October 3, 2011

Fighting Poverty in a Tough Economy, Americans Move in With Their Relatives

The financial hardships caused by the Great Recession have helped fuel the largest increase in modern history in the number of Americans living in multi-generational households. From 2007 to 2009, this group spiked from 46.5 million people to 51.4 million.

HispanicAugust 25, 2011

Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

The number of 18-to-24 year old Hispanics attending college in the United States hit an all-time high of 12.2 million in October 2010, driven by a single-year surge of 24% in Hispanic enrollment. Rising educational attainment was a dominant driver of the enrollment trends for young Hispanic adults, with the share of those completing high school and attending college on the rise.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Almost all Latino young adults say a college education is important, but only half say they themselves plan to get a degree. The reason for the disparity: Immigrants, who feel financial pressures to support a family, are half as likely as native-born Latinos to plan on graduating.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths into Adulthood

Even as their share of the young adult population has risen dramatically, young Latino adults in the United States have become more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.

U.S. PoliticsMay 15, 2006

The Cell Phone Challenge to Polling

While Americans who rely solely on a cell phone for telephone service differ in their demographics from land-line subscribers, a new study finds that so far the results obtained by surveys that exclude cell-only users are not significantly affected.