February 9, 2012

Young, Underemployed and Optimistic

A plurality of the American public believes that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today’s economy — and a lopsided majority says it’s more difficult for today’s young adults than it was for their parents’ generation to pay for college, find a job, buy a home or save for the future. But long-term economic optimism among young adults remains unscarred.

HispanicJanuary 26, 2012

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

A majority of Latinos (54%) believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.

July 6, 2011

In Two Years of Economic Recovery, Women Lost Jobs, Men Found Them

During the sluggish two-year recovery from the Great Recession, men have gained 768,000 jobs while women have lost 218,000 jobs. This new gender gap in employment trends represents a sharp turnabout from the recession itself, when men lost more than twice as many jobs as women. The current recovery is the first since 1970 in which women have lost jobs while men have gained them.

HispanicOctober 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

Immigrants are gaining jobs at a time when native-born workers continue to sustain losses. Foreign-born workers job gains may be the result of greater flexibility with regard to wages and hours of work or greater mobility. But despite rising employment, immigrants have experienced a sharp decline in earnings as well as a still substantial net loss in jobs.

September 2, 2010

Most ’Re-employed’ Workers Say They’re Overqualified for Their New Job

Workers who suffered a spell of unemployment during the recession are, on average, less satisfied with their new jobs than workers who didn’t. These re-employed workers also are more likely to consider themselves over-qualified for their current position. And six-in-ten say they changed careers or seriously thought about it while they were unemployed.

July 22, 2010

Lost Income, Lost Friends — and Loss of Self-Respect

A new Pew Research Center survey finds the long-term unemployed are more likely than the short-term unemployed not only to have lost income, but also to have lost contact with close friends, suffered strains in family relations and lost some self-respect and confidence in their long-term career prospects.

HispanicMay 13, 2010

Hispanics and the GED

Hispanics have a much higher high school dropout rate than do blacks or whites, but far fewer obtain GEDs. Among dropouts, however, native-born Hispanics are four times more likely than foreign born to have a GED, and as likely as African American dropouts.

HispanicDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Almost all Latino young adults say a college education is important, but only half say they themselves plan to get a degree. The reason for the disparity: Immigrants, who feel financial pressures to support a family, are half as likely as native-born Latinos to plan on graduating.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths into Adulthood

Even as their share of the young adult population has risen dramatically, young Latino adults in the United States have become more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.