GlobalSeptember 23, 2009

Most Mexicans See Better Life in U.S.

A survey of Mexico finds most dissatisfied with the direction of their country. Overwhelming numbers describe the economy, crime, drugs and corruption as very big problems. Many believe there is a better life in the U.S., would migrate if they had the chance, and would do so without authorization.

GlobalDecember 13, 2007

Health Problems, Priorities and Donors Worldwide

A new survey compares the health priorities of people in developing nations with those of their governments and the international organizations that work in global health.

November 13, 2007

Blacks See Growing Values Gap Between Poor and Middle Class

African Americans see a widening gulf between the values of middle class and poor blacks, and nearly four-in-ten say that because of the diversity within their community, blacks can no longer be thought of as a single race, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

GlobalJuly 24, 2007

A Rising Tide Lifts Mood in the Developing World

Even in some countries where incomes are still low and life is tough, people tend to be happier with their lives — if their economy is on the upswing. And, in Muslim countries, support for suicide bombing has declined sharply in recent years. Also, a commentary by Bruce Stokes analyzes factors contributing higher levels of happiness in many countries worldwide.

U.S. PoliticsApril 23, 2007

Va. Tech Shootings Produce Little Boost for Gun Control

Six-in-ten Americans say it is more important to control gun ownership, while 32% give priority to protecting Americans’ right to own guns. But a 55% majority opposes a ban on the sale of handguns.

January 4, 2007

Most Americans Moderately Upbeat About Family Finances in 2007

Most Americans are moderately upbeat about their family’s financial prospects in the coming year, with 57% expecting some improvement in their financial situation and another 10% expecting a lot of improvement, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.

May 23, 2006

Gambling: As the Take Rises, So Does Public Concern

A new study from the Pew Research Center finds a modest backlash in attitudes toward legalized gambling, even as the public is spending more money on more forms of legal gambling.