February 16, 2011

The Public Renders a Split Verdict On Changes in Family Structure

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the nation’s families that have unfolded over the past half century. About a third generally accepts the changes, a third is tolerant but skeptical and a third considers them bad for society.

November 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families

Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among those on the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder. A new survey finds that these less-advantaged adults are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

March 19, 2009

Public Has Split Verdict on Increased Level of Unmarried Motherhood

There is a stronger consensus in public opinion about the social cost of out-of-wedlock births than there is about the morality of these births.

July 1, 2007

As Marriage and Parenthood Drift Apart, Public Is Concerned about Social Impact

At a time when nearly four-in-ten births in this country are to an unmarried mother, the public says unwed parenting is a big problem for society. But Americans are far less inclined now than a generation ago to say children are important to a successful marriage, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.