HispanicApril 4, 2012

When Labels Don’t Fit: Hispanics and Their Views of Identity

Nearly four decades after the United States government mandated the use of the terms “Hispanic” or “Latino” to categorize Americans who trace their roots to Spanish-speaking countries, a new nationwide survey of Hispanic adults finds that these terms still haven’t been fully embraced by Hispanics themselves.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 29, 2012

The Gender Gap: Three Decades Old, as Wide as Ever

Barack Obama’s advantages among women voters over his GOP rivals are striking, with women favoring Obama over Mitt Romney by 20 points and over Rick Santorum by 26 points. When it comes to the political parties, 51% of women identify with the Democrats compared to 42% of men.

HispanicDecember 28, 2011

As Deportations Rise to Record Levels, Most Latinos Oppose Obama’s Policy

Latinos disapprove by a margin of more than two-to-one of the way the Obama administration is handling deportations of unauthorized immigrants, according to a new national survey of Latino adults by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center.

HispanicOctober 28, 2010

Illegal Immigration Backlash Worries, Divides Latinos

About four-in-five of the nation’s estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants are of Hispanic origin; a new national survey finds that Latinos are divided over what to do with these immigrants.

HispanicOctober 5, 2010

Latinos and the 2010 Elections

In a year when support for Democratic candidates has eroded, the party’s standing among Latinos appears as strong as ever. However, Hispanic voters appear to be less motivated than others to go to the polls.

U.S. PoliticsSeptember 20, 2010

Little Compromise on Compromising

The latest Congressional Connection poll finds most in the public are in no mood for political compromising. Also, Americans split evenly on which political party could best handle the economy while four-in-ten say eliminating tax cuts for the wealthy would hurt the economy.

U.S. PoliticsMay 21, 2009

Independents Take Center Stage in the Obama Era

Centrism has emerged as a dominant factor in public opinion as the Obama administration begins. Republicans and Democrats are even more divided than in the past, while the growing political middle is steadfastly mixed in its beliefs about government, the free market and other values that underlie views on contemporary issues and policies. Both political parties have lost adherents since the election and an increasing number of Americans identify as independents.

HispanicJanuary 15, 2009

Hispanics and the New Administration: Immigration Slips as a Priority

Latinos, who heavily supported Obama in the November election, rate such issues as the economy, health care and education as the more important issues facing the country. Hispanics were more likely to be first time voters than the general public.

HispanicNovember 5, 2008

How Hispanics Voted in the 2008 Election

Hispanics voted for Sens. Barack Obama and Joe Biden over Sen. John McCain and Gov. Sarah Palin by a margin of more than two-to-one according to an analysis by the Pew Hispanic Center of exit polls, with Latino youth supporting the Democratic ticket by an even wider margin.

HispanicSeptember 18, 2008

Hispanics See Their Situation in U.S. Deteriorating

Increasingly widespread pessimism among Hispanics, as well as their strong opposition to federal enforcement policies, could well have consequences in the political arena.