September 10, 2012

A Third of Americans Now Say They Are in the Lower Classes

The percentage of Americans who say they are in the lower-middle or lower class has risen from a quarter of the adult population to about a third in the past four years, according to a national survey of 2,508 adults by the Pew Research Center.

August 31, 2012

Public Says a Secure Job is Ticket to the Middle Class

Americans believe that having a secure job is by far the most important requirement for being in the middle class, easily trumping homeownership and a college education, according to a new nationwide Pew Research Center survey of 2,508 adults.

February 9, 2012

Young, Underemployed and Optimistic

A plurality of the American public believes that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today’s economy — and a lopsided majority says it’s more difficult for today’s young adults than it was for their parents’ generation to pay for college, find a job, buy a home or save for the future. But long-term economic optimism among young adults remains unscarred.

May 15, 2011

Is College Worth It?

College costs are rising, student debt is mounting, and the public is skeptical about the value of a college degree, according to two new Pew Research Center surveys. Meantime, only 19% of college presidents say the U.S. system is the best in the world. But more than eight-in-ten college graduates say college was a good investment for them personally.

September 2, 2010

Most ’Re-employed’ Workers Say They’re Overqualified for Their New Job

Workers who suffered a spell of unemployment during the recession are, on average, less satisfied with their new jobs than workers who didn’t. These re-employed workers also are more likely to consider themselves over-qualified for their current position. And six-in-ten say they changed careers or seriously thought about it while they were unemployed.

July 22, 2010

Lost Income, Lost Friends — and Loss of Self-Respect

A new Pew Research Center survey finds the long-term unemployed are more likely than the short-term unemployed not only to have lost income, but also to have lost contact with close friends, suffered strains in family relations and lost some self-respect and confidence in their long-term career prospects.

September 17, 2009

Take this Job and Love It

The self-employed are far more satisfied with their jobs and more likely to work because they want to and not for a paycheck. But if you decide to strike out on your own, don’t count on financial security.

September 3, 2009

Recession Turns a Graying Office Grayer

Older adults are staying in the labor force longer, and younger adults are staying out of it longer. Both trends intensified with the recession and are expected to continue after the economy recovers. One reason: Older workers value not just a paycheck, but the psychological and social rewards.

March 26, 2009

The Phantom Recovery

The eight-year period from 1999 through 2007 is the longest in modern U.S. economic history in which inflation-adjusted median household income failed to surpass an earlier peak.

GlobalJuly 22, 2008

The Chinese Celebrate Their Roaring Economy As They Struggle With Its Costs

As they eagerly await the Beijing Olympics, the Chinese people express extraordinary levels of satisfaction with the way things are going in their country and with their nation’s economy. With more than eight-in-ten having a positive view of both, China ranks number one among 24 countries on both measures in the 2008 survey by the […]