GlobalJuly 10, 2012

Most Muslims Want Democracy, Personal Freedoms and Islam in Political Life

More than a year after the first stirrings of the Arab Spring, there continues to be a strong desire for democracy in Arab and other predominantly Muslim nations. A substantial number in key Muslim countries also want a large role for Islam in political life. Meanwhile, few think the U.S. favors democracy in the Middle East.

GlobalMay 8, 2012

One Year Later, Egyptians Embrace Democracy, Islam in Political Life

Egyptians remain upbeat about the course of the nation and prospects for progress. Most Egyptians continue to want democracy, with two-in-three saying it is the best form of government. Egyptians also want Islam to play a major role in society.

U.S. PoliticsMarch 9, 2011

Continuing Divide in Views of Islam and Violence

The public remains divided over whether Islam is more likely than other religions to encourage violence among its believers. Political and ideological divisions are wide, though. Most conservatives and Tea Party supporters link Islam with violence.

GlobalDecember 2, 2010

Muslim Publics Divided on Hamas and Hezbollah

While Hamas and Hezbollah continue to receive mixed ratings from Muslim publics around the globe, opinions of al Qaeda and bin Laden are consistently negative. Meanwhile, most Muslims surveyed welcome a significant role for Islam in their countries’ politics, and most also say democracy is preferable to any other kind of government.

U.S. PoliticsSeptember 25, 2007

Public Expresses Mixed Views of Islam, Mormonism

The Muslim and Mormon religions have gained increasing national visibility in recent years. Yet most Americans say they know little or nothing about either religion’s practices, and large majorities say that their own religion is very different from Islam and the Mormon religion. At the same time, overall evaluations of Mormons and Muslim Americans are on balance positive.

GlobalMay 23, 2006

Where Terrorism Finds Support in the Muslim World

Attitudes toward suicide bombings and other terrorist acts directed against civilians depend more on where those activities take place — and who they are directed against — than on demographic or other differences among Muslim populations.