August 22, 2012

The Lost Decade of the Middle Class

As the 2012 presidential candidates prepare their closing arguments to America’s middle class, they are courting a group that has endured a lost decade for economic well-being. Since 2000, the middle class has shrunk in size, fallen backward in income and wealth, and shed some – but by no means all – of its characteristic faith in the future.

April 19, 2012

A Gender Reversal On Career Aspirations

In a reversal of traditional gender roles, young women now surpass young men in the importance they place on having a high-paying career or profession.

February 16, 2012

The Rise of Intermarriage

Marriage across racial and ethnic lines continues to be on the rise in the United States. The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity increased to 15.1 % in 2010, and the share of all current marriages that are either interracial or interethnic has reached an all-time high of 8.4%.

February 9, 2012

Young, Underemployed and Optimistic

A plurality of the American public believes that young adults are having the toughest time of any age group in today’s economy — and a lopsided majority says it’s more difficult for today’s young adults than it was for their parents’ generation to pay for college, find a job, buy a home or save for the future. But long-term economic optimism among young adults remains unscarred.

HispanicJanuary 26, 2012

Hispanics Say They Have the Worst of a Bad Economy

A majority of Latinos (54%) believe that the economic downturn that began in 2007 has been harder on them than on any other ethnic group in America.

January 19, 2010

New Economics of Marriage: The Rise of Wives

A larger share of women today, compared with their 1970 counterparts, have more education and income than their spouses. As a result, in recent decades the economic gains associated with marriage have been greater for men than for women.

HispanicJanuary 8, 2009

Hispanics and the Economic Downturn: Housing Woes and Remittance Cuts

Latinos, especially the foreign-born, are feeling the sting of the economic downturn and, in some respects, even more so than the general population.

HispanicDecember 15, 2008

Latino Workers in the Ongoing Recession: 2007 to 2008

The current recession has seen a small but significant decline in the percentage of Latino immigrants active in the U.S. labor force; however, the absolute number of immigrant Latinos working or seeking work still increased slightly over the last year.

HispanicOctober 2, 2008

Non-Citizen Immigrant Households Suffer Sharp Decline in Income, 2006-2007

The current economic slowdown has taken a far greater toll on households headed by non-citizens than it has on the U.S. population as a whole, according to a Pew Hispanic Center analysis of new Census data.

HispanicJune 4, 2008

Latino Labor Report, 2008: Construction Reverses Job Growth for Latinos

The slump in the construction industry has taken a heavy toll on Latino workers. From a historic low in late 2006, the unemployment rate for Latinos rose sharply in 2007 and currently stands well above the rate for non-Latinos. Immigrant Latino workers have been hit especially hard.