HispanicOctober 29, 2010

After the Great Recession: Foreign Born Gain Jobs; Native Born Lose Jobs

Immigrants are gaining jobs at a time when native-born workers continue to sustain losses. Foreign-born workers job gains may be the result of greater flexibility with regard to wages and hours of work or greater mobility. But despite rising employment, immigrants have experienced a sharp decline in earnings as well as a still substantial net loss in jobs.

HispanicDecember 15, 2008

Latino Workers in the Ongoing Recession: 2007 to 2008

The current recession has seen a small but significant decline in the percentage of Latino immigrants active in the U.S. labor force; however, the absolute number of immigrant Latinos working or seeking work still increased slightly over the last year.

HispanicJune 4, 2008

Latino Labor Report, 2008: Construction Reverses Job Growth for Latinos

The slump in the construction industry has taken a heavy toll on Latino workers. From a historic low in late 2006, the unemployment rate for Latinos rose sharply in 2007 and currently stands well above the rate for non-Latinos. Immigrant Latino workers have been hit especially hard.

HispanicJanuary 24, 2008

Arizona’s Population Growth Parallels America’s

How will Arizona’s new law penalizing businesses for hiring unauthorized immigrants affect its labor force? The Pew Hispanic Center provides up-to-date estimates of the state’s demographics as well as two other fact sheets analyzing the characteristics of the overall Latino population in the U.S. and of foreign-born immigrants of all origins.

HispanicAugust 21, 2007

1995-2005: Foreign-Born Latinos Make Progress on Wages

Foreign-born Latino workers made notable progress between 1995 and 2005 when ranked by hourly wage. The proportion of foreign-born Latino workers in the lowest quintile of the wage distribution decreased to 36% from 42% while many workers moved into the middle quintiles.

HispanicMarch 7, 2007

Construction Jobs Expand for Latinos Despite Slump in Housing Market

Despite the housing slump, Hispanic workers find a ready market for their skills.

HispanicDecember 15, 2005

The Occupational Status and Mobility of Hispanics

Hispanics and whites perform different types of work in the labor market. Moreover, the occupational divide between the two largest segments of the labor force appears to be widening. The occupations in which Hispanics are concentrated rank low in wages, educational requirements and other indicators of socioeconomic status.