February 16, 2012

The Rise of Intermarriage

Marriage across racial and ethnic lines continues to be on the rise in the United States. The share of new marriages between spouses of a different race or ethnicity increased to 15.1 % in 2010, and the share of all current marriages that are either interracial or interethnic has reached an all-time high of 8.4%.

August 17, 2011

Women See Value and Benefits of College; Men Lag on Both Fronts, Survey Finds

At a time when women surpass men by record numbers in college enrollment and completion, they also have a more positive view than men about the value higher education provides.

June 27, 2011

Living Together: The Economics of Cohabitation

The share of 30- to 44-year-olds living as unmarried couples has more than doubled since the mid-1990s. Adults with lower levels of education — without college degrees — are twice as likely to cohabit as those with college degrees.

HispanicMay 13, 2010

Hispanics and the GED

Hispanics have a much higher high school dropout rate than do blacks or whites, but far fewer obtain GEDs. Among dropouts, however, native-born Hispanics are four times more likely than foreign born to have a GED, and as likely as African American dropouts.

May 6, 2010

The New Demography of American Motherhood

Compared with mothers of newborns in 1990, today’s new moms are older, better educated and less likely to be white. A record 41% of births were to unmarried women; but most continue say this is bad for society.

February 24, 2010

The Millennials: Confident. Connected. Open to Change.

A new national survey focuses on American teens and twenty-somethings who are making the passage into adulthood at the start of a new millennium. These young people have begun to forge their generational personality: confident, self-expressive, liberal, upbeat and open to change.

January 19, 2010

New Economics of Marriage: The Rise of Wives

A larger share of women today, compared with their 1970 counterparts, have more education and income than their spouses. As a result, in recent decades the economic gains associated with marriage have been greater for men than for women.

HispanicDecember 11, 2009

Between Two Worlds: How Young Latinos Come of Age in America

Never before in this country’s history has a minority ethnic group made up so large a share of the youngest Americans.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Almost all Latino young adults say a college education is important, but only half say they themselves plan to get a degree. The reason for the disparity: Immigrants, who feel financial pressures to support a family, are half as likely as native-born Latinos to plan on graduating.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths into Adulthood

Even as their share of the young adult population has risen dramatically, young Latino adults in the United States have become more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.