GlobalMarch 6, 2012

Does Humanitarian Aid Improve America’s Image?

Humanitarian aid to countries struck by major natural disasters — such as the earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan nearly a year ago — has produced more favorable opinions of the U.S. among the populations of those countries. But the long term impact of such aid on public opinion has proved to have its limits.

GlobalJune 1, 2011

Japanese Resilient, but See Economic Challenges Ahead

A majority in Japan believe their country will emerge stronger in the aftermath of the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami. The Japanese are broadly unhappy with their own government’s handling of the catastrophe, but there is considerable praise for the U.S. Most Japanese, however, also foresee a rocky economic road ahead.

GlobalJune 17, 2010

Obama More Popular Abroad than at Home, Global Image of U.S. Continues to Benefit

The president gets an enthusiastic thumbs up from the world (with the notable exception of the U.S.) for the way he has handled the world economic crisis. Obama’s personal popularity remains high, as do favorable views of the U.S. In a striking difference from the Bush years, while many around the world disagree with Obama’s foreign policies, the U.S. image has not been significantly dented as a result. Muslim countries, however, continue to hold a negative view of America and most also give Obama unfavorable ratings.

U.S. PoliticsJanuary 4, 2007

The Complicated Politics of Free Trade

Crafting effective U.S. trade policies in an era of rapid economic globalization is tough. But the politics of free trade are even tougher — particularly for Democrats, according to a recent national survey conducted by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press.

U.S. PoliticsDecember 20, 2006

Free Trade Agreements Get a Mixed Review

The American public continues to have a mixed opinion about free trade agreements such as NAFTA and the WTO. On balance they are seen as a good thing for the country, but Americans are divided over the impact of free trade agreements on their own personal financial situations.