HispanicAugust 25, 2011

Hispanic College Enrollment Spikes, Narrowing Gaps with Other Groups

The number of 18-to-24 year old Hispanics attending college in the United States hit an all-time high of 12.2 million in October 2010, driven by a single-year surge of 24% in Hispanic enrollment. Rising educational attainment was a dominant driver of the enrollment trends for young Hispanic adults, with the share of those completing high school and attending college on the rise.

August 17, 2011

Women See Value and Benefits of College; Men Lag on Both Fronts, Survey Finds

At a time when women surpass men by record numbers in college enrollment and completion, they also have a more positive view than men about the value higher education provides.

May 15, 2011

Is College Worth It?

College costs are rising, student debt is mounting, and the public is skeptical about the value of a college degree, according to two new Pew Research Center surveys. Meantime, only 19% of college presidents say the U.S. system is the best in the world. But more than eight-in-ten college graduates say college was a good investment for them personally.

June 16, 2010

Minorities and the Recession-Era College Enrollment Boom

Freshman enrollment at post-secondary institutions rose by a 40-year record of 6% in the 2007-2008 school year, with Hispanics experiencing the largest increase in enrollments; half of the total increase in enrollment occurred in just 109 institutions out of nearly 6,100.

October 29, 2009

College Enrollment Hits All-Time High, Fueled by Community College Surge

Driven by a recession-era surge in enrollments at community college, the number of Americans ages 18 to 24 attending college hits a new high, while the high school dropout rate falls to a record low.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

Latinos and Education: Explaining the Attainment Gap

Almost all Latino young adults say a college education is important, but only half say they themselves plan to get a degree. The reason for the disparity: Immigrants, who feel financial pressures to support a family, are half as likely as native-born Latinos to plan on graduating.

HispanicOctober 7, 2009

The Changing Pathways of Hispanic Youths into Adulthood

Even as their share of the young adult population has risen dramatically, young Latino adults in the United States have become more likely to be in school or the work force now than their counterparts were in previous generations.

September 3, 2009

Recession Turns a Graying Office Grayer

Older adults are staying in the labor force longer, and younger adults are staying out of it longer. Both trends intensified with the recession and are expected to continue after the economy recovers. One reason: Older workers value not just a paycheck, but the psychological and social rewards.