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Scott Keeter

Senior Survey Advisor

Scott Keeter is a senior survey advisor at Pew Research Center. In this role, provides methodological guidance to all of Pew Research Center’s research areas. An expert on American public opinion and political behavior, he is co-author of four books, including A New Engagement? Political Participation, Civic Life, and the Changing American Citizen (Oxford University Press), The Diminishing Divide: Religion’s Changing Role in American Politics (Brookings Institution Press), What Americans Know about Politics and Why It Matters (Yale University Press), and Uninformed Choice: The Failure of the New Presidential Nominating System (Praeger). His other published research includes articles and book chapters on survey methodology, political communications and behavior, and health care topics. Prior to joining Pew Research Center, he taught at George Mason University, Rutgers University and Virginia Commonwealth University, where he also directed a survey research center. Keeter is a graduate of Davidson College and received his doctorate in political science from the University of North Carolina. He is a past president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and has been an election night analyst of exit polls for NBC News since 1980. In 2016, Keeter won the American Association for Public Opinion Research’s highest honor, the AAPOR Award for Lifetime Achievement, for “outstanding contribution to the field of public opinion research.”

Publications
MethodsOctober 9, 2018

Comparing Survey Sampling Strategies: Random-Digit Dial vs. Voter Files

A new telephone survey experiment finds that an opinion poll drawn from a commercial voter file produces results similar to those from a sample based on random-digit dialing.

Pew Research CenterMarch 9, 2018

How to access Pew Research Center survey data

Pew Research Center makes most of its datasets available for download once reporting has been completed for a given study. Here’s how to find and access our data.

Fact TankOctober 17, 2016

Putting post-debate ‘flash polls’ into perspective

In the aftermath of presidential debates, there is intense interest in gauging “who won.” How can we know the answer to that question?

MethodsAugust 1, 2016

Flashpoints in Polling

Many people wonder: Can polls be trusted? The following essay contains a big-picture review of the state of polling, organized around a number of key areas.

MethodsMay 2, 2016

Evaluating Online Nonprobability Surveys

Online nonprobability surveys are fast, cheap, and increasingly popular. We compared nine samples and found that accuracy varied substantially.

Fact TankJuly 21, 2015

The challenges of polling when fewer people are available to be polled

With response rates low and heading lower, how can survey researchers have confidence in their findings? Scott Keeter, director of survey research at Pew Research Center, addresses this issue and related questions.

Fact TankMay 14, 2015

Methods can matter: Where Web surveys produce different results than phone interviews

A Pew Research Center experiment found several key areas where Web surveys produced different results than those conducted by phone.

Fact TankJanuary 7, 2015

Pew Research will call more cellphones in 2015

An estimated 46.5% of U.S. adults are cell-only today. To keep pace with this trend, the Pew Research Center will increase the percentage of respondents interviewed on cellphones in its typical national telephone surveys to 65%.

Fact TankJune 26, 2014

Q/A: How Pew Research created the political typology

The goal of the political typology is to sort people into homogeneous groups, based on their political values and attitudes. It’s an effort to categorize people politically to help us better understand the complexities of the current political landscape.

Fact TankJanuary 15, 2014

Pew Research increases share of interviews conducted by cellphone

In the coming months, 60% of interviews in our national polls will be conducted via cellphones and 40% on landline phones.