Numbers, Facts and Trends Shaping Your World

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Ruth Igielnik is a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. She focuses on the Center’s research on social and demographic trends, politics and methodology. Igielnik is a contributing author of studies about voter files, likely voter modeling, gun ownership and political polarization. Before joining the Center, Igielnik worked in political polling for campaigns and candidates. She received her master’s degree in public policy with a specialization in data analytics from Carnegie Mellon University and a bachelor’s from University of Maryland. Igielnik is an active member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and regularly presents at the organization’s annual conference.

Publications
August 22, 2018

Most Americans say more women running for Congress is a good thing, as hope for a female president grows

Women are running for Congress in record numbers this year, and most Americans say this is a good thing. But there’s little consensus among the public about how – or whether – things would change if more women were elected. More than four-in-ten Americans say they personally hope a woman will be elected president in their lifetime.

May 22, 2018

What Unites and Divides Urban, Suburban and Rural Communities

Despite widening gaps in politics and demographics, Americans across community types have a lot in common in key facets of their lives.

March 16, 2018

How Millennials today compare with their grandparents 50 years ago

Our analysis finds that Millennials stand apart from the young adults of the Silent generation when it comes to education, employment and home life.

July 10, 2017

Rural and urban gun owners have different experiences, views on gun policy

Nearly six-in-ten rural Americans have a gun in their household, compared with smaller shares of suburban and urban gun owners.

June 22, 2017

Key takeaways on Americans’ views of guns and gun ownership

About four-in-ten Americans say they either own a gun themselves or live in a household with guns, and 48% say they grew up in a household with guns.

Pew Research CenterFebruary 3, 2017

Where refugees to the U.S. come from

Of the 84,995 refugees admitted to the United States in fiscal year 2016, the largest numbers came from the Democratic Republic of Congo, Syria, Burma (Myanmar) and Iraq.

Fact TankDecember 8, 2016

GOP gained ground in middle-class communities in 2016

Although many middle-class areas voted for Barack Obama in 2008, they overwhelmingly favored Donald Trump in 2016, a shift that was a key to his victory.

Fact TankSeptember 22, 2016

A political profile of disabled Americans

Overall, Americans with disabilities are engaged with the upcoming election, but they are less likely to turn out to vote as they face a number of obstacles to voting.

Fact TankJuly 25, 2016

Ride-hailing services are seen by minorities as a benefit to areas underserved by taxis

Americans who live in majority-minority communities are more likely than those who reside in predominately white neighborhoods to say that ride-hailing apps serve neighborhoods that taxis won’t visit.

Fact TankMarch 10, 2016

Many Americans say they voted, but did they?

One-in-six (16%) of those who say they “definitely voted” in the 2014 midterm election have no record of voting in commercially available national voter files.