July 14, 2010

Gender Equality When Economic Times are Tough?

11 of 22

Majorities in 11 of 22 countries reject the idea that men should have more of a right to a job than women do during tough economic times.

Around the globe, solid majorities express support for gender equality and agree that women should be able to work outside the home. During times of economic trouble, however, such egalitarianism does not always hold up. Still, majorities in 11 of 22 countries surveyed by the Pew Global Attitudes Project reject the idea that men should have more of a right to a job than women do during tough economic times. Continued support for both men and women in economic downturns is strongest in the U.S. and Western Europe. In Nigeria as well as in many Asian and predominantly Muslim countries, however, most respondents say that men should receive preferential treatment when jobs are scarce. In many nations — especially Egypt but also Jordan, Russia, Kenya, Nigeria, South Korea, Poland, Indonesia and Lebanon — men are more likely than women to agree with the idea that men should receive preferential treatment for jobs in tough economic times. In Japan, the opposite pattern in gender differences is evident; women (48%) are more likely than men (33%) to agree that men should receive preferential treatment for jobs in challenging times. Read More