U.S. Politics Dec. 18, 2008

Bush and Public Opinion

Just 11% say Bush will be remembered as an outstanding or above average president — by far the lowest positive end-of-term rating for any of the past four presidents. Yet Bush’s impact on public opinion over the past eight years is seen in ways that go well beyond his personal unpopularity.

U.S. Politics Dec. 15, 2008

Hillary’s New Job Better Known than Dow Jones Average

While just about everyone knows Obama’s new secretary of state, fewer than half were generally aware of where the Dow is trading these days. A new Pew News IQ survey provides an updated look at the public’s knowledge of political and world affairs. Test your own knowledge of current affairs against that of the broader public before you read the report.

U.S. Politics Dec. 11, 2008

Bearish Outlook Fuels Consumer Cutbacks

Nearly six-in-ten who say they are cutting back or delaying purchases report they are doing so because they worry things might get worse. Fewer than one in four say they are cutting back because their own financial situation has worsened. Lower fuel and food costs do not appear to have had a positive impact on the public so far.

U.S. Politics Nov. 13, 2008

High Marks for Campaign, High Bar for Obama

A week after the election, voters are feeling good about themselves, the presidential campaign and Barack Obama. Looking ahead, they have high expectations for the Obama administration, with two-thirds predicting that he will have a successful first term.

U.S. Politics Nov. 12, 2008

Few Will Miss Campaign News

The 2008 campaign set records for interest and will long be remembered (in fact, 23% of Americans are saving a post-election newspaper), but fully 82% of Americans will have no problem taking election news out of their lives. Also, Bill O’Reilly comes in as American’s favorite — and least favorite — campaign commentator.

U.S. Politics Nov. 6, 2008

Election Weekend News Interest Hits 20-Year High

Fully 60% of voters followed campaign news very closely this weekend, the highest level of interest on the eve of an election since the Pew Research Center began tracking campaign news interest in 1988. Throughout the campaign, Americans said they were hearing more about Obama than about McCain, although analysis shows news coverage became closely balanced between the two candidates.

U.S. Politics Nov. 2, 2008

Obama Leads McCain 52% to 46% in Campaign’s Final Days

The Pew Research Center’s final pre-election poll of 2,587 likely voters finds 49% supporting or leaning to Obama, 42% for McCain; 2% for minor party candidates and 7% undecided. When the undecided vote is allocated, Obama holds a 52% to 46% lead over McCain. The survey was conducted from Oct. 29 to Nov. 1.

U.S. Politics Oct. 30, 2008

Palin Fatigue Now Rivals Obama Fatigue

Sarah Palin’s new wardrobe caught the public’s eye but media coverage focused far more on the presidential candidates. Still, more Americans say they’ve been hearing too much about Palin than say they’ve heard too much about Obama.

U.S. Politics Oct. 28, 2008

McCain Support Continues Downward Spiral

A breakdown of voting intentions by demographic groups shows that since mid- September, McCain’s support has declined significantly across most voting blocs.

U.S. Politics Oct. 23, 2008

Liberal Democrats Top Conservative Republicans in Donations, Activism

With less than two weeks to go before Election Day, voters remain riveted to the presidential campaign. But liberal Democrats are engaging in far more activism than other partisan and ideological groups.