Apr. 12, 2011

Home Sweet Home. Still.

The five-year swoon in home prices has done little to shake the confidence of the American public in the investment value of homeownership. A new survey finds that fully eight-in-ten (81%) adults agree that buying a home is the best long-term investment a person can make although there has been some falloff in the intensity of the public’s faith.

Mar. 9, 2011

For Millennials, Parenthood Trumps Marriage

While 52% of Millennials say being a good parent is “one of the most important things” in life, just 30% say the same about having a successful marriage

Feb. 16, 2011

The Public Renders a Split Verdict On Changes in Family Structure

The American public is sharply divided in its judgments about the sweeping changes in the structure of the nation’s families that have unfolded over the past half century. About a third generally accepts the changes, a third is tolerant but skeptical and a third considers them bad for society.

Jan. 18, 2011

A Portrait of Stepfamilies

More than four-in-ten adults have at least one step relative. They are just as likely as others to say family is important, but they typically feel a stronger sense of obligation to biological family members than to step relatives.

Dec. 20, 2010

Baby Boomers Approach Age 65 — Glumly

Perched on the front stoop of old age, Baby Boomers are more downbeat than other age groups about the trajectory of their own lives and about the direction of the nation as a whole.

Nov. 22, 2010

The Rise of College Student Borrowing

Graduates who received a bachelor’s degree in 2008 borrowed 50% more (in inflation-adjusted dollars) than their counterparts who graduated in 1996.

Nov. 18, 2010

The Decline of Marriage and Rise of New Families

Americans today are less likely to be married than at any time in the nation’s history. Rates have declined for all groups, but they have fallen most sharply among those on the lower rungs of the socio-economic ladder. A new survey finds that these less-advantaged adults are more likely than others to say that economic security is an important reason to marry. Even as marriage shrinks, family remains the most important and most satisfying element in the lives of most Americans.

Oct. 7, 2010

The Reversal of the College Marriage Gap

In a reversal of long-standing marital patterns, college-educated young adults are now slightly more likely than young adults lacking a bachelor’s degree to have married by the age of 30.

Sep. 24, 2010

One Recession, Two Americas

For a narrow majority of Americans (55%), the Great Recession brought a mix of unemployment, missed mortgage or rent payments, shrinking paychecks and shattered household budgets. But for the other 45%, the recession was largely free of such difficulties.

Sep. 15, 2010

Walking Away

Nearly six-in-ten Americans say it is “unacceptable” for homeowners to stop making their mortgage payments, but more than a third say the practice of “walking away” from a home mortgage is acceptable under certain circumstances. Homeowners whose home values declined during the recession and those who have spent time unemployed are more likely to say that “walking away” from a mortgage is acceptable.