Sep. 20, 2012

Where the Public Stands on Government Assistance, Taxes and the Presidential Candidates

When the national conversation focuses on class, the social safety net and the distribution of wealth as it has in the past week, the public sees clear differences between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, and Obama has an overall advantage.

Sep. 12, 2012

A Recovery No Better than the Recession

The median income of American households decreased by as much in the two years after the official end of the Great Recession as it did during the recession itself. The current recovery is the worst for household income for any post-recession period in decades.

Sep. 10, 2012

A Third of Americans Now Say They Are in the Lower Classes

The percentage of Americans who say they are in the lower-middle or lower class has risen from a quarter of the adult population to about a third in the past four years, according to a national survey of 2,508 adults by the Pew Research Center.

Aug. 31, 2012

Public Says a Secure Job is Ticket to the Middle Class

Americans believe that having a secure job is by far the most important requirement for being in the middle class, easily trumping homeownership and a college education, according to a new nationwide Pew Research Center survey of 2,508 adults.

Aug. 27, 2012

Yes, the Rich Are Different

As Republicans gather for their national convention in Tampa to nominate a presidential candidate known, in part, as a wealthy businessman, a new nationwide Pew Research Center survey finds that many Americans believe the rich are different than other people.

Aug. 22, 2012

The Lost Decade of the Middle Class

As the 2012 presidential candidates prepare their closing arguments to America’s middle class, they are courting a group that has endured a lost decade for economic well-being. Since 2000, the middle class has shrunk in size, fallen backward in income and wealth, and shed some – but by no means all – of its characteristic faith in the future.

Aug. 1, 2012

Growing Share of Americans Live in Income-Segregated Neighborhoods

Upper- and lower-income Americans are more likely now than 30 years ago to live in economically segregated neighborhoods, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. Residential segregation by income has risen in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest metropolitan areas since 1980, with the big three in Texas — Houston, Dallas and San Antonio — leading the way.

Apr. 19, 2012

A Gender Reversal On Career Aspirations

In a reversal of traditional gender roles, young women now surpass young men in the importance they place on having a high-paying career or profession.

Mar. 21, 2012

The Demographics of the Jobs Recovery

Hispanics and Asians are gaining jobs at a faster rate in the economic recovery than are blacks and whites, and immigrants are outpacing the native born. The disparities reflect the rapidly changing demographics of the U.S. workforce.

Mar. 15, 2012

The Boomerang Generation

Large majorities of young adults ages 25 to 34 who are living at home with parents say they’re satisfied with that arrangement and upbeat about their future finances.