Global May. 2, 2011

Osama bin Laden Largely Discredited Among Muslim Publics in Recent Years

In the months leading up to Osama bin Laden’s death, a survey of Muslim publics around the world found little support for the al Qaeda leader.

U.S. Politics Apr. 27, 2011

Deficit: More Concern, Less Optimism

The public increasingly views the federal budget deficit as a major problem the country must address now, but is becoming less optimistic progress will be made on the issue.

Hispanic Apr. 26, 2011

The Latino Electorate in 2010: More Voters, More Non-Voters

More than 6.6 million Latinos voted in last year’s election — a record for a midterm. But Latino representation among the electorate remains below their representation in the general population. This gap is driven by two demographic factors: youth and non-citizenship.

Global Apr. 25, 2011

Egyptians Embrace Revolt Leaders, Religious Parties and Military, As Well

A nationwide survey of Egypt finds Egyptians mostly satisfied with the way things are going and optimistic about the country’s future. But the nation remains cautious about the prospects for political change. Also, U.S. favorability ratings remain low, and Israel fares even more poorly.

Apr. 12, 2011

Home Sweet Home. Still.

The five-year swoon in home prices has done little to shake the confidence of the American public in the investment value of homeownership. A new survey finds that fully eight-in-ten (81%) adults agree that buying a home is the best long-term investment a person can make although there has been some falloff in the intensity of the public’s faith.

U.S. Politics Apr. 11, 2011

Budget Negotiations in a Word

The public has an overwhelmingly negative reaction to the budget negotiations that narrowly avoided a government shutdown. A weekend survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Washington Post finds that “ridiculous” is the word used most frequently to describe the budget negotiations.

U.S. Politics Apr. 8, 2011

Civil War at 150: Still Relevant, Still Divisive

A century and a half after the firing on Fort Sumter, most Americans say the war between the North and South is still relevant to American politics and public life today. In a nation that has long endured deep racial divisions, the history of that era continues to elicit strong reactions. Nearly half of the public (46%) says it is inappropriate for today’s public officials to praise the leaders of the Confederate states during the war; 36% say such statements are appropriate.

U.S. Politics Apr. 7, 2011

Obama Ratings Slip Amid Economic Anxieties

About as many now approve (47%) as disapprove (45%) of the way Obama is handling his job with the president getting especially negative ratings on his handling of the budget deficit and the overall economy. The GOP has an advantage on the budget, while Democrats are favored on traits such as concern for average people, willingness to work with the opposition, and ethics. The parties run about even on jobs and health care.

U.S. Politics Apr. 5, 2011

Fewer See Clear Goal in Libya; Opposition to Arming Rebels

While half say the U.S. made the right decision in conducting airstrikes in Libya, fewer see a clear goal than did so last week. Americans believe preventing terrorism and keeping oil prices low should be important goals of the U.S. in the Middle East, but there is less consensus on encouraging democracy and protecting Israel.

U.S. Politics Apr. 4, 2011

Most Want Budget Compromise but Split on Who’s to Blame for a Shutdown

With a deadline approaching for a possible shutdown of the federal government, the public remains divided over whether congressional Republicans or the Obama administration would be more to blame if a shutdown occurs.