U.S. Politics Aug. 23, 2007

A Study in Contrasts: Clinton and Guiliani

Sen. Hillary Clinton is by far the most popular presidential candidate among her own party’s voters, but among the general public, she has one of the lowest favorable ratings of the leading candidates. In sharp contrast, the front-running Republican candidate, Rudy Giuliani, evokes relatively modest enthusiasm from the GOP base, but is as broadly popular with all voters as any candidate in either party.

U.S. Politics Aug. 22, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

In the second of two parts, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience news preferences to examine news interest across decades and describe how the public’s news interests have changed — or not changed — over different news eras.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Two Decades of American News Preferences

Despite dramatic structural changes in the news media since the 1980s, the interests of news audiences have changed very little over the past several decades. Disaster News and Money News have been at the top of the charts throughout, while Tabloid News and Foreign News have been at the bottom. In this first of two reports, Pew Research Center consultant Michael Robinson analyzes data from 165 surveys on audience preferences taken by the PRC (and predecessor organizations) since 1986.

U.S. Politics Aug. 15, 2007

Presidential Campaign Isn’t Making a Good First Impression

The 2008 presidential campaign already seems to be wearing out its welcome with many Americans. A 52% majority of the public offers a negative assessment of the early-blooming campaign and just one-in-five has a kind thing to say.

U.S. Politics Aug. 9, 2007

Small Audience For Murdoch’s Dow Jones Deal, Few Expect Change

A majority of Americans who are following the story of publisher Rupert Murdoch’s purchase of the Wall Street Journal say the sale will have little or no impact on the quality of the newspaper.

U.S. Politics Aug. 9, 2007

Internet News Audience Highly Critical of News Organizations

Americans continue to fault news organizations for a number of perceived failures. Solid majorities criticize the news media for political bias, inaccuracy and failing to acknowledge mistakes. Some of the harshest indictments of the press come from the growing segment that relies on the internet as its main news source.

U.S. Politics Aug. 2, 2007

A Summer of Discontent with Washington

All three branches of the federal government are under fire from the American public. Just 29% approve of President Bush’s job performance while the proportion with a favorable view of Congress has declined 12 percentage points since January. Even favorable opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court have fallen, from 72% in January to 57% currently.

U.S. Politics Aug. 2, 2007

Public Blames Media for Too Much Celebrity Coverage

An overwhelming majority of the public (87%) says celebrity scandals receive too much news coverage; and most who say celebrity news is over-covered blame the media — not the public.

U.S. Politics Jul. 26, 2007

Hillary Clinton Most Visible Presidential Candidate

Hillary Clinton leads all Democrats with 42% of the public saying they have heard the most about her in the news lately.

U.S. Politics Jul. 19, 2007

Who’s Wild About Harry?

The latest News Interest Index survey finds that, at least so far, most of the public isn’t especially interested in news about the final installment in the Harry Potter series or the release of a new Potter movie; but an astounding number say they plan to buy Deathly Hallows when the book goes on sale on Saturday.