Oct. 5, 2011

War and Sacrifice in the Post-9/11 Era

As the United States marks the 10th anniversary of the longest period of sustained warfare in its history, the overwhelming majority of veterans of the post-9/11 era are proud of their military service. At the same time, many report that they have had difficulties readjusting to civilian life, and have suffered from post-traumatic stress. While veterans are more supportive of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq than the general public, just one-third say that both been worth fighting.

Oct. 3, 2011

Fighting Poverty in a Tough Economy, Americans Move in With Their Relatives

The financial hardships caused by the Great Recession have helped fuel the largest increase in modern history in the number of Americans living in multi-generational households. From 2007 to 2009, this group spiked from 46.5 million people to 51.4 million.

U.S. Politics Sep. 29, 2011

No Consensus About Whether Nation Is Divided Into ’Haves’ and ’Have-Nots’

The public is divided on the question of whether the U.S. has become a society of economic ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots,” with 52% saying it is incorrect to think of the country this way while 45% say such a division exists.

Sep. 28, 2011

Childhood Poverty Among Hispanics Sets Record, Leads Nation

More Latino children are living in poverty—6.1 million in 2010—than children of any other racial or ethnic group.

Sep. 13, 2011

Adding Context to the Census Bureau’s Report on the Rise in Poverty Rate

Recent Pew Research Center reports provide extra context for Tuesday’s announcement by the Census Bureau the nation’s poverty rate grew to 15.1% in 2010.

Aug. 28, 2011

The Digital Revolution and Higher Education

As online college courses are becoming more prevalent, the public is skeptical about their educational value. Only 29% of Americans say online classes are equal in value to classes taken in person. College presidents have a more positive view of online learning and they foresee dramatic growth in this area.

Aug. 25, 2011

How Accurate Are Counts of Same-Sex Couples?

Two decades after the Census Bureau began offering people the option to describe themselves as a same-sex “unmarried partner,” producing accurate numbers on same-sex couples remains a challenge.

Aug. 17, 2011

Women See Value and Benefits of College; Men Lag on Both Fronts, Survey Finds

At a time when women surpass men by record numbers in college enrollment and completion, they also have a more positive view than men about the value higher education provides.

Jul. 29, 2011

Wealth Gaps and Perception Gaps: A Paradox of the Great Recession

When the real estate market melted down, those hit hardest by the sharp drop in household wealth were blacks and Hispanics. But even while their wealth was being decimated, the political reaction among the nation’s minorities has been surprisingly muted.

Jul. 26, 2011

Wealth Gaps Rise to Record Highs Between Whites, Blacks and Hispanics

The lopsided wealth ratios are the largest since the government began publishing such data a quarter century ago and roughly twice the size of the ratios that had prevailed between these three groups for the two decades prior to the Great Recession that ended in 2009.