May. 24, 2010

Census by the Books

Curious about how the decennial census got started and how it has evolved? Here’s a short list of selected books that explore its history and the controversies surrounding the count from colonial times to the present.

May. 6, 2010

The New Demography of American Motherhood

Compared with mothers of newborns in 1990, today’s new moms are older, better educated and less likely to be white. A record 41% of births were to unmarried women; but most continue say this is bad for society.

Apr. 15, 2010

The Prisoner Dilemma: An Update

Maryland has become the first state in the nation to make plans to count prisoners at their last known home addresses, not their prison addresses, for purposes of redrawing federal, state and local legislative districts.

Apr. 15, 2010

Tea Party Consensus

Despite calls for a boycott by some conservative leaders, a new poll finds that nearly all Tea Party supporters say they have or will return their Census forms.

Apr. 9, 2010

Who and Where are the Non-Responders?

A new analysis of 2010 Census participation rates so far has found wide variation from one city to the next in the degree to which racial and ethnicity predict response rates.

Apr. 8, 2010

Census in the News

Stories about the 2010 Census account for a growing — albeit small — fraction of total U.S. news coverage.

Apr. 6, 2010

U.S. Birth Rate Decline Linked to Recession

There is a strong association between the magnitude of fertility change in 2008 across states and key economic indicators including changes in per capita income, housing prices and share of the working-age population that is employed across states.

Mar. 18, 2010

The Return of the Multi-Generational Family Household

The multi-generational American family household is staging a comeback — driven in part by the job losses and home foreclosures of recent years, but more so by demographic changes that have been gathering steam for decades. As of 2008, a record 49 million Americans, or 16.1% of the total U.S. population, lived in such a household, up from 28 million, or 12.l%, in 1980. Such households had been more common a century ago, but began to fall out of favor after World War II. Now they are coming back.

Mar. 16, 2010

The Census: College Students Count — but Where?

Should college students be counted in the 2010 Census at their parents’ home or their school address? The Census Bureau has a cut-and-dried answer, but this question recurs each decade because census rules and people’s preferences are not always in sync.

Mar. 3, 2010

Census History: Counting Hispanics

Despite the long history of Hispanic residents in the United States, there was no systematic effort to count this group separately in the Census until the late 20th century. An analysis of changes in Census question wording over recent decades reveals the challenges in trying to count and describe this fast-growing population.