Media & NewsMar 4, 2016

Half of those who aren’t learning about the election feel their vote doesn’t matter

About one-in-ten Americans (9%) did not learn about this year’s presidential election in a given week from any of 11 types of sources asked about in a January Pew Research Center survey. One striking trait of this group is their lack of faith in the impact of voting. Half of this group thinks that their […]

ReligionMar 2, 2016

Women relatively rare in top positions of religious leadership

We looked at nine major religious organizations in the U.S. that both ordain women and allow them to hold top leadership slots.

GlobalMar 2, 2016

UN peacekeeping at new highs after post-Cold War surge and decline

The number of UN peacekeeping forces around the world has peaked in recent months after falling off in the late 1990s, following a period of trial and error for UN interventions.

GlobalMar 1, 2016

Afro-Latino: A deeply rooted identity among U.S. Hispanics

One-quarter of all U.S. Latinos self-identify as Afro-Latino, Afro-Caribbean or of African descent with roots in Latin America.

ReligionMar 1, 2016

5 facts about abortion

Public opinion on abortion has held relatively steady over the years, with Americans roughly divided on the issue.

U.S. PoliticsMar 1, 2016

A divide between college, non-college Republicans

White Republicans with a college degree differ from those without a degree in their views on immigration, racial issues, politics and government, and business.

HispanicFeb 29, 2016

Super Tuesday showcases electorate’s growing racial, ethnic diversity

The U.S. electorate this year will be the country’s most diverse ever, and that is evident in several Super Tuesday states, in which blacks could have a significant impact.

Internet & TechFeb 29, 2016

5 facts about online dating

11% of American adults have used an online dating site or a mobile dating app.

ReligionFeb 29, 2016

How religious is your state?

Southern states are among the most highly religious states in the U.S., while those in New England are among the least devout.

U.S. PoliticsFeb 26, 2016

Long Supreme Court vacancies used to be more common

If Senate Republicans stick with their declared intention to not consider anyone President Obama might nominate to replace Antonin Scalia, his seat on the Supreme Court likely would remain vacant for a year or more. That would be the longest vacancy on the court for nearly five decades, but by no means the longest ever in U.S. history. In fact, for much of the 19th century it was not uncommon for Supreme Court seats to be unoccupied for months – or, in a few cases, years – at a time.