U.S. Politics May. 13, 2011

Most Say Homosexuality Should Be Accepted By Society

While the public is divided over same-sex marriage, a majority of Americans (58%) say that homosexuality should be accepted, rather than discouraged, by society. But there are wide political and religious differences in opinions on this measure.

U.S. Politics May. 11, 2011

Bush Lost Battle Over the Surplus, But Won Tax Cut War

Ten years ago this month Congress approved President Bush’ first round of tax cuts. A look back at polling history examines what the public thought the cuts, the deficit and the economy a decade ago.

U.S. Politics Apr. 12, 2011

The Deficit Debate: Where the Public Stands

In a number of surveys over the past several months, the Pew Research Center has shown where the public stands on the budget deficit — the seriousness of the problem, views of competing policy proposals, and its confidence in the policymakers.

Apr. 8, 2011

New Facts About Families

Researchers recently presented some findings that dispute the popular (or academic) wisdom about important aspects of family life and bear upon relevant findings from Pew Research surveys.

U.S. Politics Apr. 8, 2011

Tea Party: Better Known, Less Popular

As the Tea Party has evolved from a grassroots movement into a major force on Capitol Hill, public views of the movement have grown more negative. Slightly more disagree than agree with the Tea Party — a reversal in public evaluations from a year ago.

Global Mar. 31, 2011

Upbeat Chinese May Not Be Primed for a Jasmine Revolution

Judging the Chinese appetite for democracy is not easy, but polling suggests China may not be ripe for the kind of uprisings seen throughout the Middle East.

Pew Research Center Mar. 23, 2011

A Century After Triangle, Unions Face Uncertain Future

March 25, 2011 marks the 100-year anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire, a disaster widely credited with strengthening the still nascent labor union movement in the United States. Public approval of unions, which peaked in during the Depression era when many worker protections were put into law, has had its ups and downs but has hit new lows in recent years.

Hispanic Mar. 15, 2011

How Many Hispanics in the U.S.?

The number of Hispanics counted in the 2010 Census has been larger than expected in most states for which the Census Bureau has released detailed population totals so far, with the widest gaps in states with relatively small Hispanic populations.

U.S. Politics Mar. 11, 2011

The Elusive 90% Solution

This week, fully 90% of the public said that they were hearing mostly bad news about gas prices. Reaching the 90% threshold is a rare occurrence in polls, in part, because surveys focus on current issues with considerable disagreement. So what do 90% of Americans agree on?

Global Mar. 8, 2011

Will Enthusiasm for Democracy Endure in Egypt and Elsewhere?

While the parallels between former Soviet bloc countries and Middle Eastern nations should not be overdrawn, the experience of Eastern Europe after the collapse of the Soviet empire is a useful reminder that public enthusiasm for democracy is not guaranteed as political change extends over years and decades.