Global Jul. 13, 2006

G8 Summiteers Inspire Little Confidence Around the Globe

When President George W. Bush is greeted by his host, President Vladimir Putin at this weekend’s G8 meeting in St. Petersburg, neither one can feel secure in the confidence placed in their leadership by the citizens of major countries around the globe. But the latest Pew Global Attitudes survey also finds that the other leaders at the annual summit also earn generally low marks for their handling of world affairs.

Pew Research Center Jul. 6, 2006

Do the Democrats Have a ’God Problem’?

Religion’s Political Power

Pew Research Center Jun. 28, 2006

No Clamor for Amendment From Flag-Waving Public

About two-in-three Americans fly the flag. Nearly three-in-four say flag burning should be illegal. Roughly half say it should be unconstitutional. But despite these protective instincts, there’s been no public clamor demanding that Congress take steps to defend Old Glory against burners and desecrators.

Internet & Tech Jun. 14, 2006

Surfing to the Bank

Some 63 million Americans now let their keyboards do their banking, as online financial housekeeping has burgeoned along with internet use generally. But the “trust gap” may limit further growth, especially among less financially experienced internet users.

U.S. Politics Jun. 6, 2006

Two Americas, One American

The differences that divide us are much smaller than those that set us apart from the rest of the world

Hispanic May. 30, 2006

The Optimistic Immigrant

Hispanics in general, and recent immigrants in particular, are more inclined than blacks or whites to take an upbeat view about one of the most enduring tenets of the American dream — that each generation will do better in life than the one that preceded it.

U.S. Politics May. 30, 2006

Politics and the “DotNet” Generation

Not only is there evidence of a reawakening of young people to public life, but today’s youth are politically distinctive in many ways.

Global May. 23, 2006

Where Terrorism Finds Support in the Muslim World

Attitudes toward suicide bombings and other terrorist acts directed against civilians depend more on where those activities take place — and who they are directed against — than on demographic or other differences among Muslim populations.

U.S. Politics May. 15, 2006

The Iraq-Vietnam Difference

This time, the opposition runs strongly along party lines.

U.S. Politics May. 9, 2006

Attitudes Toward Immigration in Red and Blue

New analysis finds predominantly Republican “red” as well as swing counties significantly more opposed to immigration – both legal and illegal – than are predominantly Democratic “blue” counties, where immigrants are much more populous.