Pew Research Center Nov. 1, 2006

Voter Turnout and Congressional Change

In recent decades, there have been three basic ways that turnout has worked to produce the sort of “big wave” midterm that the Democrats are hoping for next week.

Global Oct. 26, 2006

Are National Polls Reliable Predictors of Midterm Elections?

National elections are the high season for pollsters and with Election Day now less than two weeks away, new polls on the fight for Congress are being released nearly every day. Commonly, pollsters use something called the “generic ballot” to assess the state of the congressional race. Just how accurate is the “generic ballot” in predicting election results?

U.S. Politics Oct. 26, 2006

Cell-Only Voters Not Very Different

Political pollsters continue to cast a wary eye on the growing number of Americans who use only a cell phone and have no landline. The Pew Research Center estimates that this group now constitutes one-in-ten adults. But three Pew surveys of cell-only Americans this year have found that their absence from landline surveys is not creating a measurable bias in the bottom-line findings.

U.S. Politics Oct. 26, 2006

Can Safe Seats Save the Republicans?

One of the biggest political questions in the final weeks of this Congressional campaign is whether the national trend in support for Democratic candidates is big enough to overcome the safe-seat redistricting that in recent years has led to fewer and fewer seats turning over in Congress.

U.S. Politics Oct. 18, 2006

Evangelicals and the GOP: An Update

White evangelical Protestants have become the most important part of the Republican Party’s electoral base, making up nearly one-in-four of those who identify with the GOP and vote for its candidates. This analysis examines the current state of evangelical support for the GOP, in light of the approaching 2006 elections.

U.S. Politics Oct. 11, 2006

Growing Number of Liberal Democrats

About one-third of Democratic voters now describe themselves as liberal, an increase since 2000, when just one-in-four Democrats self-identified with the “L-word.” Meantime, some 41% of Democrats now call themselves moderate and 23% say they are conservatives.

Pew Research Center Oct. 5, 2006

Nerds Gone Wild

Ceremonies at Harvard honor scientists who discovered why woodpeckers don’t get headaches, why people dislike the sound of fingernails scraping on a blackboard and how many photos are needed to ensure that no one in the picture has their eyes closed. Plus declining teacher quality and the latest research into shop-a-holics.

Internet & Tech Oct. 5, 2006

Riding the Waves of “Web 2.0″

This Pew Internet report provides a short history and description of the catch-all Internet buzzword “Web 2.0″ and examines the Web applications it describes.

Internet & Tech Sep. 28, 2006

Digital ’Natives’ Invade the Workplace

Newcomers to the world of work may find that their bosses are strangers in the digital world

U.S. Politics Sep. 28, 2006

Blue States Get Even More Democratic

Red States Stay Red, Blue States Get Bluer, Swing States Deadlock