U.S. Politics Aug. 3, 2012

Party Affiliation and Election Polls

In every campaign cycle, pollwatchers pay close attention to the details of every election survey. And well they should. But focusing on the partisan balance of surveys is, in almost every circumstance, the wrong place to look.

Pew Research Center Aug. 2, 2012

The Rise in Residential Segregation by Income

Paul Taylor, executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, answers questions on the Center’s study showing an increase in residential segregation by income in the nation’s largest metro areas.

U.S. Politics Aug. 2, 2012

Little Public Awareness of Outside Campaign Spending Boom

The public is hearing little about increased spending by outside groups in the 2012 election. Just 25% have heard a lot about outside spending by groups not associated with the candidates or campaigns. Three-quarters are hearing a little or nothing at all about this. And just 40% can correctly identify the term “Super PAC.”

Internet & Tech Aug. 2, 2012

Mobile Phone Problems

Telemarketing calls and spam texts are realities for most cellphone users, according to a new survey. Smartphone owners are particularly likely to report dropped calls and slow download speeds.

U.S. Politics Aug. 2, 2012

Romney’s Personal Image Remains Negative

By a 52% to 37% margin, more voters say they have an unfavorable than favorable view of Mitt Romney. Barack Obama’s image is, by comparison, more positive, though both face lower favorability ratings than most presidential candidates in recent elections. Obama continues to hold a sizable lead over Romney among registered voters, though his edge is narrower in battleground states

U.S. Politics Aug. 1, 2012

Colorado Rampage Tops News Interest for July

In the final two weeks of July, Americans kept a close watch on news about a deadly shooting rampage at a Colorado movie theater, but they also closely tracked news about two long-running stories – the condition of the nation’s economy and the 2012 presidential campaign.

Aug. 1, 2012

Growing Share of Americans Live in Income-Segregated Neighborhoods

Upper- and lower-income Americans are more likely now than 30 years ago to live in economically segregated neighborhoods, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis. Residential segregation by income has risen in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest metropolitan areas since 1980, with the big three in Texas — Houston, Dallas and San Antonio — leading the way.

U.S. Politics Aug. 1, 2012

Catholics Share Bishops’ Concerns about Religious Liberty

Catholics who are aware of U.S. bishops’ concerns about restrictions on religious liberty generally agree with the bishops’ concerns, according to a new report. Yet there are no significant differences in presidential vote preferences between Catholic voters who have heard and those who have not heard about the bishops’ protests against government policies they see as restrictive of religious liberty.

U.S. Politics Jul. 31, 2012

Two-Thirds of Democrats Now Support Gay Marriage

Reports that the Democratic Party may add support for gay marriage to its party platform are in keeping with a significant shift of opinion on this issue among Democrats nationwide. A new report finds that support for same-sex marriage among Democrats has jumped from 50% in 2008 to 65% today.

U.S. Politics Jul. 30, 2012

Views on Gun Laws Unchanged After Aurora Shooting

There has been no significant change in public views on the issue of gun control and gun rights following the July 20th shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. Other recent major shootings also had little effect on public opinion about gun laws.